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Samsung Galaxy Note7

 

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Samsung Commits to Recycling Parts from Galaxy Note7

Jul 18, 2017, 7:31 AM   by Eric M. Zeman

Samsung plans to extensively reuse, recycle, and recover, parts and materials found in last year's failed Galaxy Note7 smartphone. The company confirmed plans to recycle the phone earlier this year, but has now provided more details on exactly what it hopes to accomplish. Samsung said it will reuse parts such as the OLED display, memory components, and camera modules in future devices. Other components will be sold. Further, Samsung claims it can recover some 157 tons of gold, silver, cobalt, and copper from the recalled handsets. The company says it is committed to pursuing these efforts in ways that are eco-friendly. Samsung will begin the process of recycling the Galaxy Note7 this month. The phone was recalled last year after manufacturing flaws led to overheating batteries and fires. The news comes mere weeks before Samsung is expected to announced the Galaxy Note 8.


Samsung Resurrects the Note 7 'Fan Edition' for Korea

Jul 3, 2017, 6:45 AM   by Eric M. Zeman

Samsung has brought the ill-fated Galaxy Note 7 back from the grave as the Note 7 Fan Edition. The Note 7 is infamous for battery problems that led to smoke, burns, fires, and other catastrophes. Samsung was forced to recall the phone and later determined two separate flaws impacted the battery, one pertaining to design and the other pertaining to manufacturing. Samsung decided to scavenge the recalled devices to create a new handset with a new, smaller 3,200mAh battery and its latest software, including the Bixby voice assistant. Samsung is manufacturing only 400,000 Galaxy Note 7 Fan Edition handsets, which will be made available exclusively in Samsung's home market of South Korea. The company is widely expected to announce the Galaxy Note 8 within the next two months, which will serve as Samsung's high-end, professional-grade smartphone with stylus pen input.


Samsung Says No Refurbished Galaxy Note7s In the US

Mar 28, 2017, 8:36 AM   by Eric M. Zeman

Galaxy Note7 fans in the U.S. will not be able to buy a refurbished model, reports Reuters. Samsung "will not be offering refurbished Galaxy Note7 devices for rent or sale in the U.S.," according to a statement provided by the company. On Monday, Samsung announced plans to sell reconditioned Note7s in select markets, though it has yet to say where. Phones that cannot be reconditioned will be broken down into their individual components so Samsung can scavenge them for use in other devices.


Samsung Plans to Sell Refurbished Galaxy Note7

Mar 27, 2017, 9:18 AM   by Eric M. Zeman   updated Mar 27, 2017, 9:42 AM

Samsung plans to bring back the Galaxy Note7, despite the massive recall that spelled the phone's demise last year. The company will sell refurbished versions of the phone, though Samsung is still determining where via talks with regulatory authorities and carriers. Samsung didn't detail exactly how the phone has been refurbished. It was pulled from store shelves shortly after launch due to faulty batteries. Presumably any refurbished units would, at a minimum, include brand new batteries. Note7 units that aren't refurbished for sale will be broken down into individual components so Samsung can recover chips, camera modules, and rare metals found within the phone. Samsung did not say when it expects to resurrect the Note7.


CPSC Wants Safer Batteries, But Admits to Limitations

Jan 25, 2017, 8:38 AM   by Eric M. Zeman

In the wake of the Samsung Galaxy Note7 recall, the U.S. Consumer Product Safety Commission hopes to see more safeguards put in place with respect to battery-powered products. The CPSC commended Samsung and its carrier partners for the successful recall of the Note7, which has so far enjoyed a 97% return rate, but noted that the majority of the annual 400 consumer product safety recalls "result in a frustratingly and dangerously low consumer response rate." The agency plans to improve its ability to asses high-density battery technology and spot gaps in safety standards moving forward, and at the same time warned that the agency has limited capacity to handle such tasks. "CPSC is a vital health and safety agency, but we have nowhere near the resources and people power that Samsung does. Not even close," said Chairman Elliot F. Kaye in a statement. "In fact, Samsung employed more engineers and staff to work on just this issue than CPSC has employees at our entire agency. At a minimum, industry needs to learn from this experience and improve consumer safety by putting more safeguards in place during the design and manufacturing stages to ensure that technologies run by lithium-ion batteries deliver their benefits without the serious safety risks." Samsung this week explained that the Note7 was impacted by two separate battery flaws. The flaws led the device to sometimes overheat and catch fire. The company was forced to cancel the device in September 2016 and recall some 2.5 million units worldwide.


Samsung Blames Note7 Recall On 2 Battery Problems

Jan 22, 2017, 8:20 PM   by Eric M. Zeman

Samsung today said problems created during the manufacture of the Galaxy Note7's battery caused the phone to sometimes overheat and burst into flame. The company says two separate battery defects are at fault, but maintains nothing was wrong with the phone itself. In the first battery, a design flaw led the external casing to be too small to accommodate the internal components. The tight fit caused some electrodes to bend and others to break. This led the battery to short-circuit, overheat, and in some cases ignite. In the second battery, which was made by a third-party supplier, a welding defect introduced during manufacturing led to similar short-circuiting, overheating, and ignition problems. Samsung said this third-party battery was rushed to market, which may have played a role in creating the defect. Samsung tasked some 700 engineers to test some 200,000 Note7 smartphones for problems. The company checked various components, such as the USB port, wireless charging components, iris scanner, processor and radio, and other parts to ensure they didn't play a role in the phone's thermal problems. Samsung says three independent, external investigating firms reached the same conclusions. In sum, Samsung says the battery is to blame for the Galaxy Note7's fire problems and the resulting recall of the handset. The company has introduced new quality checks in its manufacturing processes — and demanded the same checks from its parts suppliers — to ensure problems like this do not arise again.


Researchers Devise Fire-Resistant Battery

Jan 18, 2017, 11:16 AM   by Eric M. Zeman

Adding a flame-retardant to select elements of lithium ion batteries many prevent fires, according to researchers at Stanford University. The researchers figured out how to create a nonwoven electrospun separator out of triphenyl phosphate and coated it with a heat-activated polymer. The separator sits between the anode and cathode within batteries. The thermal-triggered coating would melt in the event a battery overheats, thus releasing the triphenyl phosphate flame retardant into the battery. The researchers claim this more or less suppresses combustion almost immediately. The researchers' method doesn't impact the battery under normal temperatures and can be fine-tuned to handle thermals generated under normal use. Such technology may have prevented the fire-catching Galaxy Note7 problem Samsung dealt with last year. The researchers note further safety testing is needed before the technology can be used in consumer devices.


Verizon to Further Cripple Thousands of Unreturned Note7s

Jan 17, 2017, 7:55 PM   by Eric M. Zeman

Verizon Wireless is prepared to take another drastic step in order to convince thousands of customers still holding onto the Samsung Galaxy Note7 that it's time to return the phone. "In spite of our best efforts, there are still customers using the recalled phones who have not returned or exchanged their Note 7 to the point of purchase," said a Verizon spokesperson to Fortune. "The recalled Note 7s pose a safety risk to our customers and those around them." Verizon is prepared to put the handsets into a special category on its system that will allow them to call only 911 or Verizon customer service. Moreover, Verizon notes that in some cases the customers have already been reimbursed for the phone so Verizon might bill those customers the full retail cost. Verizon has already updated its variant of the Galaxy Note7 so the phone cannot be charged and is useless as mobile device. Samsung recalled the Note7 in September after a number of units overheated and caught fire.


S. Korean Authorities to Arrest Samsung Heir On Bribery Charges

Jan 16, 2017, 8:28 AM   by Eric M. Zeman

Prosecutors in South Korea plan to arrest Lee Jae-yong, the heir to Samsung's massive array of businesses. The special prosecutor's office is recommending Lee be charged with bribery, embezzlement and perjury, though the warrant must be approved by a Korean court before it can be served. The bribery charges pertain to alleged actions that took place in 2015 between Lee and President Park Geun-hye, South Korea's leader. Lee is said to have paid Park's government a total of $36 million in bribes in order to facilitate government approval of the merger of two lower Samsung affiliates. The merger helped pave the way for Lee's succession plan, which has been in the works for several years. Samsung is a family run business, though it is also publicly traded. If Lee is arrested and held, three co-CEOs will continue to run Samsung's day-to-day business operations, but Lee's path to succession will become much less clear. President Park has already been impeached by the Korean government, which is weighing whether or not to remove her from office. It appears Park may be the real target here. "We believe the bribery is linked to the president," said a spokesperson for the special prosecutor's office. Park is said to have profited from widespread corruption since taking office. Lee's arrest would be another black mark in Samsung's book, which has suffered in recent months from the Note7 recall.


FAA to Halt Galaxy Note7 Warnings Thanks to 96% Return Rate

Jan 11, 2017, 8:17 AM   by Eric M. Zeman

Samsung said this week that the U.S. Department of Transportation and Federal Aviation Administration are no longer requiring airlines to warn passengers about the Galaxy Note7 during boarding. Samsung says high participation of its refund and exchange program has helped it collect most outstanding devices. "By leveraging our digital technology to target each device, we've had over 96% of Galaxy Note7 phones returned to date," said the company in a statement. "Together with our wireless carriers, we have taken aggressive action to limit the remaining phones' ability to work as mobile devices, further enhancing participation in the recall." Over the last few weeks, U.S. carriers have distributed a system update to remaining Note7 handsets that prevents them from charging, effectively rendering them useless. Samsung thanked consumers, airlines, airports, and the government for their patience during the recall. Samsung was forced to cancel the phone after a number of units overheated and caught fire.


T-Mobile Has Neutered Its Variant of the Galaxy Note7

Dec 29, 2016, 8:24 AM   by Eric M. Zeman

T-Mobile this week pushed a device-killing, over-the-air update to all remaining Galaxy Note7 devices still being used by its customers. The update prevents the battery from charging, effectively rendering the phone useless. The idea is to convince people still using the Note7 to trade it in immediately. The Note7 suffers from a battery issue that may lead to overheating and fires. In some cases, Note7 owners reported car fires and house fires. Samsung was forced to recall the device earlier this year. T-Mobile competitors AT&T, Sprint, and Verizon all plan to deliver the same update during the first week of January. All carriers are offering replacement devices and/or refunds.


Verizon Has Change of Heart, Will Kill Galaxy Note7 Jan 5

Dec 15, 2016, 3:34 PM   by Eric M. Zeman

Verizon Wireless today updated its stance on Samsung's plan to brick remaining Galaxy Note7 handsets and will allow the update to go through on January 5. Earlier this month, Samsung announced plans to brick active Note7 units through a software update to be pushed December 19. The update will prevent the Note7 from charging and negate its ability to function as a mobile device. Verizon previously refused to allow the update as it didn't want to leave customers without a working handset. Now, it says it will allow the update to go through after the holidays. "We want to make sure you can contact family, first responders, and emergency medical professionals during the holiday travel season. However, we urge you to stop using your Note7, upgrade it to another device, and return the Note7 to us," said the company. AT&T, Sprint, and T-Mobile all plan to push the update, too.


Verizon Refuses to Brick Note7, Will Not Issue Samsung Update

Dec 9, 2016, 12:18 PM   by Eric M. Zeman

Verizon Wireless today said it will not brick its customers' phones during the holiday season. Samsung this morning said it will update remaining Note7s over the next few weeks and kill the phone's ability to charge. Samsung believes this will coax remaining owners to return or exchange the device. Verizon disagrees with this strategy. "Verizon will not be taking part in this update because of the added risk this could pose to Galaxy Note7 users that do not have another device to switch to. We will not push a software upgrade that will eliminate the ability for the Note7 to work as a mobile device in the heart of the holiday travel season. We do not want to make it impossible to contact family, first responders or medical professionals in an emergency situation." Verizon says most of its Note7 customers have already returned the device. The carrier reiterates that any Note7s still in the wild need to be exchanged as soon as practical. The Note7 is subject to overheating and causing fires. The device was recalled and cancelled by Samsung.


Samsung to Brick Unreturned Note7s

Dec 9, 2016, 11:44 AM   by Eric M. Zeman

Samsung today said it plans to take aggressive steps in order to convince Note7 owners to exchange their devices. Beginning December 19, Samsung will issue a software update that will prevent the Note7 from charging and kill its ability to work as a mobile device. "Together with our carrier partners, we will be notifying consumers through multiple touchpoints to encourage any remaining Galaxy Note7 owners to participate in the program and to take advantage of the financial incentives available," said the company in a statement. According to Samsung, about 93% of U.S. consumers who purchased a Note7 have returned and/or exchanged their device. The company implores remaining owners to shut the device down and turn it in as soon as possible. A number of Note7 units overheated and caught fire. The device was recalled in full and cancelled by Samsung.


Samsung Says Galaxy S8 to Get Its Own Personal Assistant

Nov 7, 2016, 8:40 AM   by Eric M. Zeman

Samsung said its Galaxy S8 smartphone, due next year, will include a digital personal assistant to help owners with spoken requests. The assistant will rely on artificial intelligence technology that Samsung acquired last month when it closed its purchase of Viv. Beyond offering help with Samsung's own apps and services, Samsung said the personal assistant will work with third-party apps. "Developers can attach and upload services to our agent," said Samsung Executive Vice President Rhee Injong about the assistant. Samsung had previously said it would use Viv to add a personal assistant to its phones, but had not specifically named the Galaxy S8. The company hopes next year's flagship handset will revive its fortunes and offset the losses incurred during the Note7 recall.


Samsung to Cripple Unreturned Galaxy Note7s

Nov 4, 2016, 4:44 PM   by Eric M. Zeman

Samsung is prepared to employ a more aggressive tactic in order to convince those who've not yet returned their Galaxy Note7 smartphone that they should do so soon. The company says about 85% of all Note7s sold in the U.S. have been safely returned, but 15% have not. "To further drive participation [in the Note7 Refund and Exchange Program], we will be releasing a software update in the coming days that will limit the phone's ability to charge beyond 60%, as well as issue a reminder pop-up notification every time a consumer charges, reboots, or turns on the screen of their Note7 device," said the company. Samsung says Note7 owners who still have their device should power it down immediately and bring it to the point of sale for a refund or exchange as soon as possible. Samsung ceased manufacturing the Note7 and issued a global recall for the phone after some of the devices overheated and sparked fires.


Samsung Sets Up In-Airport Kiosks to Facilitate Note7 Returns

Oct 18, 2016, 7:17 AM   by Eric M. Zeman

Samsung has begun accepting Galaxy Note7 returns at airports in several countries. The action follows the recent ban from the Dept. of Transportation that makes it a federal crime to bring the Note7 on any airplane. Other countries have put similar bans in place. Samsung began accepting Note7 returns at airports on its home market of Korea, followed by Australia and some locations in the U.S., including San Francisco International Airport. The idea is to help prevent travelers from carrying the Note7 onto planes, which poses a safety risk, while also providing them with a replacement device (even if only temporarily). The booths are located before security checkpoints at "high-traffic" terminals. Samsung has not provided a list for U.S. airports, nor said if it will expand beyond those already in operation.


DoT Bans Galaxy Note7 From All Flights

Oct 14, 2016, 3:00 PM   by Eric M. Zeman

Consumers who still own a Samsung Galaxy Note7 will not be allowed to bring them onto airplanes at all beginning noon on Oct. 15. The U.S. Dept. of Transportation today classified the Note7 as a forbidden hazardous material under the Federal Hazardous Material Regulations. Passengers cannot transport the phone on their person, in their carry-on bags, or in their checked bags on any/all flights in the U.S. "We recognize that banning these phones from airlines will inconvenience some passengers, but the safety of all those aboard an aircraft must take priority," said Transportation Secretary Anthony Foxx. "We are taking this additional step because even one fire incident inflight poses a high risk of severe personal injury and puts many lives at risk." The FAA had previously asked Note7 owners to keep the devices powered off while aboard aircraft. This new ban replaces the previous action. The Dept. of Transportation said travelers who attempt to fly with the phone may face fines and criminal prosecution. Moreover, those who attempt to hide the phone in baggage will likely see the device confiscated. Flight crews will be instructed to keep an eye out for the device and take action if necessary.


Samsung to Reward Note7 Owners' Loyalty with Cash

Oct 13, 2016, 7:15 AM   by Eric M. Zeman

Samsung is offering a cash incentive to Galaxy Note7 owners if they stick with the Samsung brand. U.S. consumers who exchange their Note7 for any other Samsung handset will be rewarded with $100 in bill credits. Consumers who exchange their Note7 for a phone made by another company will be given $25 in bill credits. The financial incentive arrives as Samsung expands its recall of the Note7 to all devices, both the original and the replacement. The number of Note7s being recalled in the U.S. stands at about 1.9 million. Samsung hasn't said how many have even returned/exchanged. "We appreciate the patience of our consumers, carriers, and retail partners for carrying the burden during these challenging times," said Samsung Electronics America COO Tim Baxter. "We are committed to doing everything we can to make this right." There have been 96 documented cases of the Note7 overheating in the U.S., according to the U.S. Consumer Product Safety Commission, with 15 of those coming from supposed safe devices.


Samsung Ceases Production and Sales of Note7

Oct 11, 2016, 7:13 AM   by Eric M. Zeman

Samsung today pulled the plug on the Galaxy Note7 handset, ostensibly putting an end to the embattled smartphone. Late Monday, the company asked carriers and retail partners to stop sales and exchanges of the phone while it continued its investigation. Today, the company went a step further. "Taking our customer's safety as our highest priority, we have decided to halt sales and production of the Galaxy Note7." The company urged all Note7 owners to power the device down and return it as soon as practical. A manufacturing defect of some mind impacted an unknown number of Note7 batteries, some of which overheated and caught fire causing burns and property damage. Samsung later identified what it thought were safe Note7 units and offered those as replacements. Unfortunately, a number of the Note7 replacement units deemed safe also caught fire. It's unclear what future the Galaxy Note series in general has now that Samsung has cancelled the Note7. Analysts cited by the Wall Street Journal suggest the cancellation could wipe about $2.8 billion in profit from Samsung's fourth quarter earnings. Investors have already punished Samsung's stock, and the company has lost some $17 billion in value this week alone.


Samsung to Halt Galaxy Note7 Sales Globally

Oct 10, 2016, 5:55 PM   by Eric M. Zeman

Samsung this evening said it will halt all sales of the Galaxy Note7 smartphone on a global basis. "Because consumers’ safety remains our top priority, Samsung will ask all carrier and retail partners globally to stop sales and exchanges of the Galaxy Note7 while the investigation is taking place," said the company in a statement. "We remain committed to working diligently with appropriate regulatory authorities to take all necessary steps to resolve the situation." Samsung urged people who have either an original or replacement Note7 to power it down and return it to the point of sale.


T-Mobile, Too, Halts Note7 Replacements

Oct 9, 2016, 7:51 PM   by Eric M. Zeman

T-Mobile this evening joined AT&T in putting a stop to exchanges, replacements, and sales of the Samsung Galaxy Note7. "While Samsung investigates multiple reports of issues, T-Mobile is temporarily suspending all sales of the new Note7 and exchanges for replacement Note7 devices," said the company. Customers can bring their new and/or replacement Note7 (along with any purchased accessories) to a T-Mobile store for a full refund and choose from any device in T-Mobile's inventory. The company said it will waive restocking fees, as well as allow those who preordered the Note7 to keep the free Netflix subscription, Gear FT, or SD card they might have received as a gift with the phone. Last, T-Mobile will give all Note7 customers a one-time $25 bill credit for the hassle. The carrier encourages all customers to stop using the Note7, power it down, and return it to T-Mobile as soon as practical. Sprint and Verizon are still selling the device.


AT&T Stops Exchanging the Galaxy Note7

Oct 9, 2016, 2:55 PM   by Eric M. Zeman

AT&T says it will not swap out the original Note7 for replacement devices. "Based on recent reports, we're no longer exchanging new Note7s at this time, pending further investigation of these reported incidents," said the company in a statement provided to media. "We still encourage customers with a recalled Note7 to visit an AT&T location to exchange that device for another Samsung smartphone or other smartphone of their choice." All four major carriers have said customers may bring their Note7 — original or replacement — to stores for a refund or exchange. The Note7 has vanished from the web sites of AT&T, Sprint, and T-Mobile, but it is still available from Verizon.com. Verizon hasn't said if or when it might halt sales/exchanges. Anyone with a Note7 should power it down and bring it bak to the point of sale as soon as possible.

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More 'Safe' Note7s Burn and Catch Fire

Oct 9, 2016, 2:43 PM   by Eric M. Zeman

Following Thursday's report that a Samsung Galaxy Note7 caught fire on a plane, more stories have piled up suggesting the replacement Note7 being sold by Samsung and its carrier partners is not as safe as claimed. A Farmington, Minn., teen claims her replacement Note7 burned her hand and melted its case on Oct. 7. "It felt like pins and needles except a lot more intense," said Abby Zuis to KSTP. The Zuis family has receipts that detail the authenticity of the replacement handset. Earlier in the week, a Nicholasville, Ky., man was awoken in the middle of the night by smoke created by a burning Note7. "The whole room just covered in smoke, smells awful. I look over and my phone is on fire," said Michael Klering in a statement provided to WKYT. "The phone is supposed to be the replacement, so you would have thought it would be safe. It wasn't plugged in. It wasn't anything, it was just sitting there." Klering was sickened by the smoke and sought medical attention. He was diagnosed with acute bronchitis brought on by the poisonous fumes. Further, Klering claims Samsung erroneously sent him a text message that alarmed him. Samsung said to him, "Just now got this. I can try and slow him down if we think it will matter, or we just let him do what he keeps threatening to do and see if he does it." Klering believes the message was intended for another Samsung employee. He is seeking legal help to determine what steps he might take next. Perhaps most troubling is that the Nicholasville event took place before the incident in which a replacement Note7 caught fire on a plane, prompting the plane to be evacuated and the flight to be cancelled. In all three cases, Samsung said it is working with authorities to determine the cause of the fires. The original Note7 was recalled Sept. 2 due to potentially hazardous batteries. So far, the replacement devices haven't fared much better.


Sprint to Allow Replacement Note7 Owners to Swap Phones

Oct 7, 2016, 7:13 AM   by Eric M. Zeman

Sprint said on Thursday that customers who have a replacement Samsung Galaxy Note7, and harbor lingering doubts about its actual safety, can turn it in for any other device sold by Sprint. Sprint made the decision after a device deemed safe by Samsung burned up on an airplane, forcing passengers to evacuate and the airline to cancel the flight. "[Sprint] is working collaboratively with Samsung to better understand the most recent concerns regarding replacement Samsung Galaxy Note7 smartphones," said the company in a statement provided to Recode. "If a Sprint customer with a replacement Note7 has any concerns regarding their device, we will exchange it for any other device at any Sprint retail store during the investigation window." Sprint did not say how long that window might be open. T-Mobile, AT&T, and Verizon Wireless are still selling the replacement phones, despite the most recent setback for Samsung. Consumers who still have the the original Note7 are urged to exchange it at their local carrier store. Samsung recalled the device in early September after reports of burns and fires due to a faulty battery.


Replacement Samsung Galaxy Note7 Causes Fire On Plane

Oct 5, 2016, 1:00 PM   by Eric M. Zeman

A Samsung Galaxy Note7 caught fire on a Southwest Airlines flight in Louisville, Ky., this morning, forcing the plane to be evacuated and causing damage to the plane's carpeting. The owner, Brian Green, says the Note7 was a replacement device with a marked box indicating the phone was safe. He swapped out his original Note7 at an AT&T store on Sept. 21. Replacement phones are supposed to have safe batteries and pose no risk of fire. The phone was powered down in Green's pocket when it overheated. Green tossed the phone on the floor where it began to emit smoke and eventually caught fire. The plane was still at the gate and Southwest evacuated the aircraft. No one was injured. Samsung initially expressed doubt about the phone's status as a replacement, but said it will work with authorities to determine the cause of the fire. Samsung was forced to recall the Note7 last month amid instances of it burning owners and igniting fires.


T-Mobile to Resume Galaxy Note7 Sales Oct. 5

Oct 4, 2016, 7:09 AM   by Eric M. Zeman

T-Mobile says it will once again sell the Samsung Galaxy Note7 starting October 5. Samsung was forced to recall the Note7 in early September after reports of burns, fires, and explosions blamed on the device surfaced around the world. Samsung investigated and determined that a small percentage of about 2.5 million devices might have a bad battery. To be safe, Samsung halted sales and recalled the entire batch. Replacement Note7s have been available in the U.S. for a couple of weeks. Verizon and Sprint began selling the device again in late September. T-Mobile said the Note7 will be available online and in stores this Wednesday.


Sprint and Verizon Resume Sales of Galaxy Note7

Sep 21, 2016, 9:03 AM   by Eric M. Zeman

Sprint and Verizon Wireless are once again selling the Samsung Galaxy Note7. Both companies' web sites list the device for sale and also reveal where the phone can be found at local stores. Supply of the device is limited, but determined consumers can buy the phone. Samsung and its carrier partners halted sales of the device early this month after Samsung discovered a quality issue with some batteries. About 2.5 million devices in total were recalled due to the possibility of fire risk, though the actual number of impacted devices isn't clear. Incidences of burns, fires, and explosions blamed on the phone have been reported in the media. On Tuesday, Samsung said about 500,000 replacement units are now available to original Note7 buyers who have yet to exchange their phones. Samsung and its carrier partners are pushing a software update to the Note7 so owners know whether or not their device is safe. Recalled devices will display an alert stating such, while safe devices will display a green power indicator in the status bar.


Samsung Says 500,000 Note7 Replacements Available

Sep 20, 2016, 3:55 PM   by Eric M. Zeman

Samsung Electronics America today said that 500,000 replacement Galaxy Note7 smartphones have been shipped to carrier and retail stores in the United States. The replacement devices will be made available starting September 21 to people who previously bought the Galaxy Note7 and need to exchange it for one with a known-safe battery. Further, Samsung plans to push a software update to all Note7s to help consumers identify safe devices from those that still might pose a fire risk. Once updated, new/safe Note7 units will display a green battery icon on the status bar found on the top right hand of the screen. Samsung and the U.S. CPSC urge everyone who bought a Note7 before September 15 to power down their device. A software update will be pushed to all recalled devices that will prompt owners with a safety notice urging them to turn the phone off and and exchange it. The notice will appear every time Note7 owners power up or charge their impacted phone. Note7 owners can visit Samsung's web site for more information.


US Government Issues Recall for Samsung Galaxy Note7

Sep 15, 2016, 3:44 PM   by Eric M. Zeman   updated Sep 15, 2016, 4:27 PM

The U.S. Consumer Product Safety Commission has issued a formal recall for the Samsung Galaxy Note7. The CSPC says consumers should immediately stop using and power down the recalled Galaxy Note7 devices purchased before September 15, 2016. The agency suggests consumers contact the carrier or other retailer from which they purchased the device to exchange the original Note7 for a new one with a different battery, refund, or other replacement. The recall applies to about 1 million devices shipped in the U.S. Prior to today's CPSC action, Samsung had recalled the device on its own. Samsung said, "We confirmed that new Note7 replacement devices will be available in the United States at most retail locations no later than September 21st, 2016." That means people waiting to exchange their Note7 for a new one will have to wait until next week. Consumers not willing to wait for a straight replacement can select another Samsung device, such as the Galaxy S7 or S7 Edge, and receive cash back for the price differential.


MTA Asks NYers to Turn Off the Samsung Galaxy Note7

Sep 14, 2016, 1:44 PM   by Eric M. Zeman   updated Sep 15, 2016, 6:46 AM

The New York City Metropolitan Transit Authority is asking the public not to use their Galaxy Note7 smartphone on subways or buses. "MTA customers should turn off Samsung Galaxy Note 7 before entering station or boarding bus due to concerns device's battery can ignite," said the agency via its Twitter account. The MTA admits there have been no incidents on NYC's buses and subways, but it is asking customers and employees to avoid using the phone while transiting around the city. Earlier this month, the FAA asked airplane passengers to power the device down and avoid charging it while on board aircraft. Samsung issued a recall for the device after some Note7s overheated and caught fire. It recalled about 2.5 million units that might have shipped with a defective battery and could pose a risk of fire. The actual number of dangerous phones is likely much smaller. Samsung is offering customers a replacement device.


Samsung Accessories Land Alongside Note7

Aug 19, 2016, 8:00 AM   by Eric M. Zeman

The Samsung Galaxy Note7 reaches U.S. stores today and with it some interesting accessories and companion products from Samsung. The new Gear VR headset, which is compatible with the Note7 and other recent Galaxy phones, has a new look, new color, and expanded field of view. It's available for $100 at carrier stores, as well as Amazon, Best Buy, and Samsung. The Gear 360 camera (pictured), able to shoot 360-degree photos and video, will only be available online for $350. Samsung's Gear IconX wireless earbuds are available, too. These $200 headphones are fully wireless, have built-in memory, and can track workouts. The less expensive Samsung Level Active headphones are sweat proof and can control music/calls for $100. Last, the Samsung Connect auto provides an AT&T-backed in-car hotspot via the OBD II port. The Connect auto can also send alerts to the driver and improve driving safety/efficiency. AT&T will sell the Samsung Connect auto online and in stores. The Galaxy Note7 is Samsung's flagship phablet for the year. It has a 5.7-inch screen, 12-megapixel main camera, Snapdragon 820 processor, 64 GB of storage, and the S Pen stylus. The Note7 is available from AT&T, Sprint, T-Mobile, and Verizon.


AT&T Touts Galaxy Note7 Offers

Aug 2, 2016, 3:25 PM   by Eric M. Zeman

AT&T today shared information about several promotions associated with the launch of the Samsung Galaxy Note7 smartphone. AT&T is selling the phone for $29.34 per month (for 30 months) with an AT&T Next plan, or for $36.67 per month (for 24 months) with an AT&T Next Every Year plan. Customers who buy a Note7 will be eligible for up to $695 in credit towards the purchase of a second Note7 with a new line of service. The credits will be applied monthly for 30 months. The customer is responsible for the remaining $155 difference, when taking into account the Note7's $849 sale price. Alternately, customers can buy a Note7 and get a free Samsung Gear S2 smartwatch with a two-year agreement, or buy a Note7 and get a Galaxy Tab E for $0.99. AT&T will make the Note7 available for preorder beginning August 3. It will reach AT&T stores August 19.


Hands-On with the Samsung Galaxy Note7

Aug 2, 2016, 12:22 PM   by Eric M. Zeman   updated Aug 2, 2016, 1:41 PM

Samsung's Galaxy Note7 is its most refined and most advanced smartphone yet. This glass-and-aluminum slab adds features such as an iris scanner and water resistance to the fabled phablet series from Samsung. Here are Phone Scoop's first impressions.

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Verizon To Offer Rewards to Note7 Buyers

Aug 2, 2016, 11:33 AM   by Eric M. Zeman

Verizon Wireless today said customers who preorder the Samsung Galaxy Note7 or S7 Edge can snag a free Gear Fit2 fitness band or 256 GB memory card with their purchase. Verizon plans to sell other Note7-related accessories, such as the Gear VR, Gear 360 camera, and Gear IconX wireless headphones online and in stores beginning August 19. Verizon did not detail pricing information for its variant of the Note7.


Note7's Iris Scanner Can Unlock Folders and Web Sites

Aug 2, 2016, 10:49 AM   by Eric M. Zeman

Samsung today announced Samsung Pass, an identification tool that combines the iris scanner and fingerprint reader to verify identity. Samsung Pass will be able to replace passwords for select apps. The tool allows Note7 owners to protect folders and web sites, for example, making them inaccessible unless unlocked via the owner's iris scan. Further, Samsung is offering the tool to bank app makers so they can add iris-based security to their own apps. Six banks will support Samsung Pass at launch. Samsung Pass is included with the Galaxy Note7, which goes on sale August 19.

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T-Mobile Offering Free Gift with Note7 Purchase

Aug 2, 2016, 10:41 AM   by Eric M. Zeman

T-Mobile today said customers who buy the Samsung Galaxy Note7 will receive one of three thank you gifts. Customers can select a Gear Fit2, 256 GB microSD memory card, or a free year of Netflix — each of which has a value of about $100. T-Mobile plans to sell all three colors (black, silver, blue) of the Note7. The device costs $849. Customers can pay the full price, or make a down payment of $70 and then monthly payments of $32.50 for 24 months. T-Mobile will begin accepting preorders at 12:01am August 3.


Samsung's Gear VR Headset Given a Redesign

Aug 2, 2016, 10:00 AM   by Eric M. Zeman

Samsung today introduced a brand new version of its Gear VR headset alongside the Galaxy Note7 handset. The new Gear VR improves the field of view from 96 degrees to 101 degrees and supports USB Type-C. The revised Gear VR will ship with adapters to make it backward compatible with microUSB-equipped handsets. The new headset has thicker padding and longer straps to allow for a more comfortable fit. The touchpad has been refined and placed in a deeper recess, making it easier to find and use. The Gear VR includes a dedicated Oculus Store button, too, to help people find content. The Gear VR will be available with the Samsung Galaxy Note7 later this month.

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Galaxy Note7 Borrows from S7 as Samsung Reworks Pen Features

Aug 2, 2016, 10:00 AM   by Eric M. Zeman   updated Aug 2, 2016, 10:04 AM

Samsung today announced the Galaxy Note7, its premier smartphone for the year. The device is narrower than last year's model in order to make it easier to hold, and uses a sturdier aluminum frame with symmetric slabs of Gorilla Glass 5 on either side. The Note7's defining feature is the 5.7-inch Super AMOLED quad HD screen, which is twice as sensitive to pen input when compared to the Note 5. The S Pen stylus has been redesigned and now features a tip that is the same size as a standard ballpoint pen. The Note7's note-taking functions have been bundled together into a single application that opens when the pen is removed. People can use the Note7 to easily create GIFs by dragging the S Pen across (non-DRM) video as it plays. Many of the hardware elements were taken from the Galaxy S7. For example, the Note7 relies on a Snapdragon 820 processor (for the U.S. market) with 4 GB of RAM, and includes the same 12-megapixel main camera and 5-megapixel selfie camera as the S7. The Note7 will ship in one memory configuration: 64 GB with support for memory cards up to 256 GB. The phone includes a 3,500mAh battery and supports rapid charging and rapid wireless charging. It is certified IP68 for protection against water and dust. The Note7 is the first Samsung handset to make the jump to USB Type-C and it will will ship with an adapter (Type-C-to-micro) to help consumers. The phone includes both a fingerprint reader and iris scanner for biometric security. The Note7 ships with Android 6 Marshmallow and no firm commitment from Samsung about Android 7 Nougat. Samsung's new user interface is toned down, but adds the Edge UX found on Samsung's Edge-branded handsets. Samsung revised the camera UI, which now includes swiping gestures to change from mode to mode, or switch between the front/rear cameras. The Galaxy Note7 will be sold in black, silver, and blue in the U.S. Preorders start August 3, with the August 19 the expected ship date. Carriers will announced exact availability and pricing.

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Samsung Flagship Phone, Likely Note 7, Clears FCC

Jul 14, 2016, 1:30 PM   by Eric M. Zeman

The FCC has approved an unannounced handset from Samsung that is most likely the Galaxy Note 7. The device, model name SM-N930U, is banded identically to Samsung's Galaxy S7 smartphone, which marks the N930U as a probable flagship or other high-end phone. The device supports LTE 4G in the various bands used by AT&T, Sprint, T-Mobile, and Verizon Wireless, as well as the corresponding carrier bands for WCDMA/CDMA 3G. Other technical features confirmed by the FCC include Bluetooth, GPS, NFC, and WiFi radios. The FCC did not post images, user manuals, or any other details regarding the Samsung N930U, nor do the documents refer to the device as the Note 7. Samsung has scheduled an event on August 2 in New York where it is expected to announce the Galaxy Note 7 in full. The timing of the N930U's FCC approval falls in line with a potential August launch.


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