Home  ›  News  ›

FCC Chair: T-Mobile's Binge On No Threat to Net Neutrality

Article Comments  3  

Nov 20, 2015, 8:45 AM   by Eric M. Zeman

FCC Chairman Tom Wheeler has essentially approved T-Mobile's Binge On program, which allows people to stream video over the network without impacting their data plans. "It's clear in the Open Internet Order that we said we are pro-competition and pro-innovation," said Wheeler during the agency's recent open meeting. "Clearly [Binge On] meets both of those criteria. It's highly innovative and highly competitive." The comments more or less give T-Mobile permission to move forward with the program despite concerns over its impact on net neutrality. Customers don't need to pay extra to stream video, and video providers don't need to pay T-Mobile to join the service. T-Mobile has approved 24 service providers, but quality is capped at 480p. YouTube is not among those taking part in Binge On. Consumer advocates believe T-Mobile's customers should be able to choose which video services are zero-rated, while others charge the program may distort how people use the internet. Wheeler said the agency will keep an eye on Binge On to see how it plays out in the market.

Ars Technica »

Related

more news about:

T-Mobile
 

Advertisements

Comments

This forum is closed.

This forum is closed.

Brad K

Nov 23, 2015, 11:56 AM

Net Neutrality

So it's ok to give you unlimited data streaming that's throttled, but if you want to offer X gigabytes of high speed data and unlimited throttled data after you hit the X gigs that's not ok?

Unlimited plan that's throttled to slow speeds = OK
Unlimited plan that gives some high speed and is then throttled to slow speeds = Not OK?

This is why I was opposed to this from the beginning. Net neutrality only punishes those without connections in the FCC. Do you think a company who actively spoke out against net neutrality would have gotten a pass if they came out with a throttled data service like this?

We clearly have a government right now that picks and chooses which laws it wants to enforce on who(see immigration/sanctuary cities)...
(continues)
Learn to read Brad,

>>So it's ok to give you unlimited data streaming that's throttled, but if you want to offer X gigabytes of high speed data and unlimited throttled data after you hit the X gigs that's not ok?

This has nothing to do with net ...
(continues)
...
 
 
Page  1  of 1

Subscribe to news & reviews with RSS Follow @phonescoop on Twitter Phone Scoop on Facebook Subscribe to Phone Scoop on YouTube Follow on Instagram

 

All content Copyright 2001-2022 Phone Factor, LLC. All Rights Reserved.
Content on this site may not be copied or republished without formal permission.