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Got signal 44 miles from tower

cellphonesaretools

Sep 13, 2007, 7:11 AM
Here’s an interesting one that occurred recently while visiting a place where Nextel shows no coverage (along northern California coast). Had pulled off the road to switch drivers and heard my phone beep, indicating that it had acquired signal, so stayed in that spot for a few minutes to call in to check messages. Put phone into Trace Mode to check signal strength (-95), then looked at GPS location of the tower I was connected to; Trace Mode showed tower location as N38.65578, W122.61626. Then I used the GPS function in my phone to obtain my current position, which was 38º 4.138’, -122º 58.295’ (I love being able to use the autonomous GPS function that Nextel puts in its phones now; try that with any Verizon or Sprint phon...
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nextel18

Sep 13, 2007, 8:05 AM
I highly doubt that. When you were in the trace mode, did you happen to get the signal quality and the tower number? -95 is not a good number when it comes to signal strength. In fact, it is horrible. So if you have received that number throughout the whole ordeal, you know it does change every second, it isn’t enough to support the claim that the tower can transmit over 44 miles, especially since the FCC doesn’t allow that. Moreover, Nextel’s phones do not have a lot of power on it so getting something more than 10 miles will not happen either. The DB should probably be in the 20 area and the signal quality should be in the 30s. I doubt you received both especially after the -95 you mentioned.
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cellphonesaretools

Sep 14, 2007, 12:11 AM
I suppose the GPS location of the particular tower that was reported by the phone in Trace Mode could have been erroneous; I have no way to verify that. Do you know of any cases where a Nextel phone has reported a tower's lat/lon location and been wrong? How & why would the phone give a bogus tower lat/lon location in trace mode?

I have verified via Google Earth and my car's nav system the locations of a handful of towers near my home, as reported in Trace Mode, and the phone-supplied trace mode tower lat/lon locations have always been absolutely spot-on; I can see those towers from the highway with my own eyes, and Google Earth corroborates their location almost exactly. So up to now I have no reason to think that the tower location give...
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wombough

Sep 14, 2007, 1:07 AM
44 miles come on common sense would say that this would not happen. Which is why there are towers all within 3 miles or less from each other. They would love it if they could get 44 miles out of a tower. You know how much they would save!
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nextel18

Sep 14, 2007, 1:26 AM
Can’t sleep so might as well help. The IDEN base station can transmit up to 70 miles but the FCC regulates power on the Tower and power on the device, which limits the range of a tower up to 10 miles. I am not sure if they would love to have the tower with ranges up to 70 miles because of a number of factors. Moreover, I haven’t done an analysis of the cost of right now operations against the cost for doing those 70 miles coverage. Therefore, I am not sure if there would actually be cost savings involve. A few things that would need to be done in order to get 70 miles. 1. Very clear terrain. 2. More power on both the site and the device increasing the battery size and then making the phone bulkier, which means that the voice would ...
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nextel18

Sep 14, 2007, 1:49 AM
I am going to talk generally first and then I am going to go more specific. Firstly, I wanted to say that I mentioned more than the -95 signal strength and if you read my post I mentioned something that is called DB.

As you know there is a lot of information when you look at the trace mode (in the TX status menu). It has the tower coordinates, the signal strength, signal quality, signal power, and other information that technical people at the company looks at to determine how the call would be. This is actually a better way to look at it then bars and that is why many people don’t understand that bars actually mean nothing. I wanted to say that I got confused between signal strength and signal quality but one number would have a ne...
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Yean

Sep 14, 2007, 2:22 AM
Wow, you lost me at hello. 🤣 Didn't know iDen phones with Sprint Nextel offered info, on what you guys are talking about. Very nice to know.
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nextel18

Sep 14, 2007, 6:46 AM
Hello? 🤣

Well if you knew what I was, talking about you would communicate with technical people. Motorola also provides that website as they try to sell IDEN globally. The technical people mention information that is more detailed, though, and that is if you know some because otherwise they will not tell you.
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cellphonesaretools

Sep 15, 2007, 3:28 AM
Thanks for the technical rundown, and the link to the Motorola overview PDF document (by the way, the link didn't work because there is a spurious blank space in the link you gave; I removed the blank between the "d" and "f" characters following the "ideveloper/" and the link worked fine then).

I wish now that I could provide all of the trace mode info, but at the time I neglected to jot down all of the values given in the Trace Mode screen; next time I'll try to remember to do that. Of course when it happened, I just assumed that the tower I was connected to was just a little farther than the normal distance away (i.e. a few miles). If I'd known at the time that the lat/lon coord's of the tower were 44 miles away from my location, I defi...
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nextel18

Sep 15, 2007, 8:48 AM
Glad you enjoyed it and kudos for finding that whole website on the trace mode, because I am sure it will help others. You also didn’t tell me what are the specs of that tower, even at 5000 feet, it could also be power restricted. There are just a number of data that you didn’t take note of. I can just tell you that a few times when the tower ID was showing up for billing purposes, it was giving a wrong number. Therefore, although those numbers may be correct and accurate, it may not be always the case. (I am talking about the tower ID not anything else.)

44 miles is possible but the way that the FCC limits it, and the way that phones that Nextel has doesn’t carry a lot of power in the first place, sort of refutes that who...
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wombough

Sep 15, 2007, 9:21 AM
just a question? Could it be the phone recieved it but of course with the power of phones there would be no way it could transmit back to the tower? Or for phones is it required to have 2 way com and if you dont' you get no service?
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nextel18

Sep 15, 2007, 11:31 AM
Well with devices, you need to transmit and to receive in order to complete that circuit to allow for communications to happen. One of the many reasons for no service. If the signal were going one way instead of two, then yes, going 44 miles would likely happen.
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fenrisx

Sep 15, 2007, 2:58 PM
Could it be something similar to 'skip talking' on CB radios? I know sometimes due to atmospheric conditions you can talk with people up to hundreds, if not thousands, of miles away. Although it is very sporadic.

I'm not saying that's what happened.. merely asking if something like that could happen on an iDen network?
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cellphonesaretools

Sep 16, 2007, 10:38 AM
I was thinking that something like that might have happened in this case, i.e. if not "skip talking" then at least "all the stars lined up just right", RF-wise. I am not trained in RF at all, so I can't really say, but I was assuming that the atmospheric and RF conditions happened to be just right at that particular moment.

A short distance away from where I was checking messages at the "44 mile point", I was able to transmit DC messages to two of my NextMail recipients. The messages were a little garbled in places, but also clear enough to hear most of what I said.

The only possible thing I can think of that would prove that I was not actually connected to that tower 44 miles away, is if the lat/lon of the tower I was connected to was...
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nextel18

Sep 16, 2007, 12:50 PM
I was saying with the data that you provided me wasn’t enough and conclusive to say that you actually received signal 44 miles away. Moreover, I mentioned to you earlier about that when it comes to billing of MOUs and what not, sometimes, the cell site information can be wrong and mentioned a different location. You also didn’t say where the tower was located. Just wasn’t conclusive that is all. Plus; the FCC limits.
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nextel18

Sep 16, 2007, 12:48 PM
It could be, and yes it could happen but again that person didn’t really say anything to prove that it could happen. Meaning; he didn’t provide if he was using DC, the DB, and the other data that I needed. To be that far and to transmit back and forth to a tower is unlikely, but if it’s just one-way (depending on the power of both the site and the phone) it could happen.
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jrfdsf

Sep 14, 2007, 5:07 PM
Who else is gonna give you service, 44 miles away?

REAL MEN:

Smoke Marlboros
Eat beef jerky and Slim Jims
Drive 4-wheel drive pick-ups
have more dogs than kin-folks
wear camouflage
Watch NASCAR
Have more guns than pairs of socks
Listen to country music
Love professional wrestling

But most importantly, carry Nextel phones. I mean, c'mon. Verizon? Does that "can you hear me, now" guy even resemble a "real man"? AT&T? "Rollover" is what your dogs do, not "real men". T-Mobile? They're pink! Need I say more?

The choice is clear. The only phone that's like a CB radio is the hands-down winner for all "real men". BTW, I plan on going on a trip this weekend. I'm going for 45 miles! Who's in it with me?
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cellphonesaretools

Sep 14, 2007, 10:24 PM
Yes, and lots of high level executives and successful small business owners and degreed professionals and even world-famous big-city mayors carry Nextel as well.

BTW, you can go ahead and poke fun about the 44 mile thing, I was merely posting what appeared to be an interesting occurrence, in case others were also interested or had similar experiences to share. I thought it was cool that it could have happened. Even the always-skeptical "nextel18" stated that it is, in fact, physically possible for signal to get that far, and there are many verified reports of radio signals going much farther than normal under ideal conditions.

So, go ahead and flap your gums about it, but if it didn't actually happen, then it's because the phone incorr...
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jrfdsf

Sep 15, 2007, 12:41 PM
Nah, I'm not doubting your report. Just having a little fun. 😉

I've personally gotten a signal on mine 20 miles away, and I know this for a fact, because this particular area (western N.C.) has ZERO iDEN coverage.

I also find it amusing how many on this forum will argue that it's not possible to get a signal off of a cell tower past 11 miles. Where do they get that? Radio signals have the ability to travel VAST distances, under ideal conditions. Yes, cell towers DO have low output, and cellphones are low powered devices, but still, radio signals can find a way out if they aren't being slowed down by trees, buildings or weather.

I had a pager for years that operated off of a SINGLE radio tower that could cover 200 + miles. You ...
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IPunchJerrysKids

Sep 15, 2007, 12:52 AM
Get a real phone carrier. Not one that releases droves of phones that have almost no feature differences (Nextel) and one that doesn't boot it's own customers (Sprint).
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wombough

Sep 15, 2007, 12:54 AM
verizon boots their own if they use too much data so what is your point. So does att. They all do for certain reasons!
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IPunchJerrysKids

Sep 15, 2007, 1:00 AM
But those companies are bright enough not to send a letter out that states their customers complain too much. Most businesses would know that generates bad PR. Not to mention with the horrid customer service I don't blame anyone for complaining. I have never called Sprextel in my entire life and not had to call back because somebody disconnected me. It's terrible service and you definitely get what you pay for.
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wombough

Sep 15, 2007, 1:07 AM
so if you never called them how do you know they are bad? Two I am sorry if I owned a company and I had a customer call into me more then 50 times a month I would tell them get lost. In fact more then 10 and I would be annoyed. They are not worth the trouble and are making me lose money with all the time I am putting into them. At first I thought it was the worst move but after reading it all I think it was a great move. NO way a normal customer is calling 50 times a month. And if you read it they reviewed the notes on those accounts they terminated and all wanted something for free or called to complain about something they in fact did and then blamed sprint.
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wombough

Sep 15, 2007, 1:08 AM
Why am I even talking to someone with the screename like yours. Ignorant. And not even remotely funny! And should be banned just by the name!
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jrfdsf

Sep 15, 2007, 1:11 PM
He totally DIDN'T get my post. It's obvious to anyone that it was meant in jest. Why would any reasonable, intelligent person on another carrier get offended?
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wombough

Sep 15, 2007, 8:48 PM
🤣 yeah but that is lacking on this forum. Intelegence!
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MissSLM07

Sep 19, 2007, 2:35 PM
🤣 🤣 🤣 ...are you serious?
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jrfdsf

Sep 19, 2007, 3:13 PM
MissSLM07 said:
🤣 🤣 🤣 ...are you serious?


Actually, I forgot a few:

Real men always back into parking spots, and always take the end going backwards when helping carry furniture.

Real men have dogs, never cats!

The only movie a real man ever cries over when watching is "Old Yeller".

Real men don't wear ties.

Real men never carry their cellphones in their pockets, always on a belt clip

Real men never wear yellow or pink shirts.

Real men don't eat yogurt, granola or diet food.

Real men have big screen t.v.'s.

Real men never cook, unless it's outside on the bbq grill.
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spidermon

Sep 21, 2007, 6:27 PM
you left out a word in your statement---real BROKE men carry nextels 🤣
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wombough

Sep 21, 2007, 11:12 PM
thats boost not nextel!
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jrfdsf

Sep 22, 2007, 8:59 AM
🤣
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VZW Guru

Oct 2, 2007, 9:48 AM
STUPID MEN:

Smoke Marlboros - Enjoy cancer!
Eat beef jerky and Slim Jims - poor man's meat
Drive 4-wheel drive pick-ups - must be a hick
have more dogs than kin-folks -
wear camouflage - wish you were in the army
Watch NASCAR - DEFINITELY a hick!
Have more guns than pairs of socks - typical redneck
Listen to country music - DEFINITELY a honky
Love professional wrestling - probably still think its real too!

But most importantly, only a STUPID MAN would carry Nextel phones. Plus, even after your done zip up your skin tight jeans and cowboy boots, you can shove your i315 in pants to make the ladies think your packin' something other than your slim jim!
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cellphonesaretools

Oct 3, 2007, 6:02 AM
VZW_guru has PTT envy.
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bkw212007

Sep 17, 2007, 7:24 PM
I have gotten towers as far as 60 miles away, when there are towers less than ten miles away, on clear nights. I'm in northern Ohio, where it's relatively flat topography, so maybe that's why. Pretty amazing stuff.
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wombough

Sep 18, 2007, 5:36 AM
no way come on. A radio station with 100,000 watts of power can transmit about 100 to 150 miles. Cell towers don't put out even half of that! FCC won't allow it
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nextel18

Sep 18, 2007, 8:24 AM
He has a Nextel i530, which is actually a horrible phone, and he is lucky to even get service within the 3 miles the normal tower transmits let alone 60.
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bkw212007

Sep 20, 2007, 8:57 PM
I actually have an i580. I live near Tiro, OH (44887) on a high elevated area, and got a tower in Findlay, OH (45840). I searched the GPS coordinates provided in the GPS menu of trace mode. That's where it is. I'm not making it up. The signal was very weak, obviously, but I had it.
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nextel18

Sep 21, 2007, 8:44 AM
I580 phones are horrible my friend. Chances of getting cell phone coverage on it more than 3 miles away are slim. I had that device too, and it was horrible. Those zip codes mean nothing to me especially since I have no idea where they are. Moreover, trace modes have a lot more data than just the GPS it has the TX and RX which are more important. Furthermore, I do not remember whether those GPS coordinates are actually right and/or could be off by up to a few miles. As I mentioned earlier, you have to have the TX and RX data to show that it actually went that long. You did not provide it, so obviously I doubt it.
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cellphonesaretools

Sep 22, 2007, 9:34 AM
I wonder if maybe you're a little to hung up on the string of numbers from the TX and RX trace mode displays.

I can tell you these two things with 100% certainty, willing to testify before the US Supreme court if necessary:
1) Every time I have gotten lat/lon coords of MY location using the autonomous GPS capability of my Nextel phone, then checked on Google Earth or Google Maps, the Nextel phone has ALWAYS been accurate within a few meters.
2) Every single time I have put the lat/lon of the TOWER location reported in the trace mode GPS screen and checked using Google Earth (or Google Maps with satellite images displayed), I can see clearly that there is a tower there. In many cases in my local area, I have also seen those to...
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nextel18

Sep 22, 2007, 9:52 AM
Sometimes those tower number/letters could be wrong, but it is not wrong a lot. (I mean on the tower indicator.) It has to deal with billing sometimes towers report the wrong billing information, but it is not very common, however, it does happen. I look at those TX/RX numbers very closely because is what field techs and other technical people use for the billing, and other technical information such as if they need to increase the tower output, increase the capacity, fix any issues, and other aspects.
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cellphonesaretools

Sep 24, 2007, 10:47 PM
I did describe the situation to my local Nextel network engineer; he said that if there was clear line of sight to the tower (which I have verified there was), and the tower was at or near max power allowed, weather was clear without much moisture in the air (it was a clear, cool, dry day) then it could happen. They have record of similar occurrences. Although as he said, not the norm, it does happen occasionally.

Although no power rating is given, just elevation, registered owner, call sign, etc. the antennasearch.com results can be seen at:

http://www.antennasearch.com/sitestart.asp?sourcepag ... »...
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nextel18

Sep 25, 2007, 3:53 PM
Not sure who you talked to in Nextel’s network engineering personnel, but I highly doubt they would say that to you. You have no idea if the tower’s power was on max and the data that you provided didn’t support that conclusion either.

After looking at your link, the tower as indicated is only 99 feet and that is not even enough to transmit to many places. Usually the higher the tower is the more tower is used and transmitted. If that cell site was well north of 200 feet then I would say it might happen. This is what I posted earlier to you; “On the base station, there are a few sites. Low, medium and high. Obviously it means that the low cell site has low power, medium has more power, and the high has even greater...
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wombough

Sep 25, 2007, 9:23 PM
they have local enginers? And you said personnel which would indicate more then one.

And yeah smaller towers are mostly used to cover a small area IE a dead spot.
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nextel18

Sep 26, 2007, 10:01 AM
Yes, they have field technicians as well as a center.
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wombough

Sep 26, 2007, 9:38 PM
nice I think that is awesome!
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nextel18

Sep 26, 2007, 10:44 PM
Yea. They all have it.
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cellphonesaretools

Sep 25, 2007, 10:25 PM
Last post I clearly stated the mix of conditions the NETS engineer stated would have to be present for it to happen, including that the tower would have to be at max power (please re-read my previous post - that line is there).

Also, although the tower height is listed as 98 ft, THE ELEVATION IS 3960 FEET ABOVE SEA LEVEL. I was at approx 200 ft above sea level. That means that the antenna was almost 3800 feet above me, and as stated several times now, it was a clear line of sight, no mountains in between that 4,000 ft tower and me on the coast.
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wombough

Sep 25, 2007, 10:40 PM
you also need to factor in it if was that high on a Mt. Then it not only has to traval the distance to you but the distance down to you also. Which is 3858 ft just to come down to your level.
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cellphonesaretools

Sep 26, 2007, 8:08 AM
Well, lets do the math, using the Pythagorean theorem:

The vertical distance is 3960 ft; the horizontal distance is 44.8 miles, or 236,544 ft. The hypotenuse of that right triangle then is 236,577 ft (square root of the sum of the squares - a.k.a. Pythagorean Theorem). So the vertical difference of approx 3960 ft adds only 33 ft to the signal flight distance. 33ft out of 236,577 ft is approximately 1/10,000 of one percent (i.e. 0.00014). So the vertical component's contribution of adding 33ft to the signal travel distance can reasonably be ignored.

The point of reiterating that the 98ft tower sits on top of a 3900 ft mountain is to clarify that there were no physical obstructions between that tower and my position when my phone apparen...
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nextel18

Sep 26, 2007, 9:57 AM
Of course, we have disproved your theory and logic. I told you that there is a certain amount of power that comes out of the low, medium, and high towers. If the tower is, what you mentioned it is not a high powered which means it cannot go that far in the first place. I also asked other data like DB and others, which I do not believe you gave me to determine what, is the power. I am not trying to convince you.
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cellphonesaretools

Sep 26, 2007, 10:21 PM
I was willing to let this one die until I read the patently false statement in your recent post. You said: "Of course, we have disproved your theory and logic."

Actually, you did not disprove nor prove anything; neither of us has, or can, conclusively prove or disprove the incident. I have stated that clearly from the start. I am not convinced that it did happen, but neither am I convinced that it did not happen; I believe that all of the information I've been able to gather shows that either case is possible.

I've also reiterated a number of times that the only trace mode value I wrote down was the signal strength (-95), and further that if anything like this occurs again I would definitely remember to write down all of the values rep...
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nextel18

Sep 26, 2007, 10:42 PM
Strange. You start off by saying you wish this to die but then you wrote over, what looks like to be, 400 or so words. I disproved your theory because it is quite simple. 1. That -92 number is not a good number to even remotely send signals that far. 2. I asked you for the DB number which is far more important than number 1. 3. Just the fact that the FCC and Nextel’s phones limit the power on purpose disproves your theory. 4. At 99 feet for the cell site that means it is low powered which means it cannot transmit back and forth the distance that you claimed it did. It could transmit there, but not back, and if it was able to do that, you would show no service on your phone.

As for the engineer you talked to, I would actually like t...
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cellphonesaretools

Sep 27, 2007, 10:09 AM
When I said it was time to let this subject pass, I also stated that either one of us could be right, and that there was no way to prove it 100% conclusively either way, unless a person inside Nextel could view the detailed records of that call. Then you made the statement that you had proven that you were right and I was wrong. Misinformation and incorrect statements like yours should always be corrected, so that's why I replied to that one. And now you've thrown down the gantlet again, so a new reply is appropriate. Also, I have new data to share with you.

BTW, the local NETS engineer I spoke with cited one of the towers in his maintenance area that regularly reaches some of his customers 33 miles from the closest tower (in the Mojave d...
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nextel18

Sep 27, 2007, 10:51 AM
Of course there is a way to prove it. The data that you mentioned to me is enough to prove that your theory and logic is incorrect. With the information that I have gathered from you, this wasn’t that much, is enough to say that. Also the engineers that I spoke to can confirm it too. I would rather believe them than your contact especially since they are in the top of many engineering companies but mostly Nextel’s.

I also mentioned to you earlier, regarding billing, that sometimes it is incorrect and the cell site gets the information wrong. It happens on all companies’ networks. It happened to me a lot actually.

I didn’t read the rest.
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jrfdsf

Sep 27, 2007, 5:17 PM
And folks on here say my threads are too long and drawn out. Looks like I've got some competition in this dept.
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jrfdsf

Sep 27, 2007, 5:19 PM
Just thought I'd throw that into the discussion for good measure! 😁

I wonder if anyone else has had a 44 mile experience on another forum?
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nextel18

Sep 26, 2007, 9:55 AM
I understand that the tower is actually on 3800 above you but the structure itself is only98 feet high, which alone, cannot have enough power output to actually go a far distance. Of course it can cover your area as well as probably up to 5 miles if that, but still the data that you provided, and not sure if you actually provided the DB or not and the other data I wanted, doesn’t support it. If you want to believe it go ahead because I cannot stop you. I will not convince you either. I am just saying it on facts and data nothing else.
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nextel18

Sep 18, 2007, 8:26 AM
I give cellphonesaretools credit for trying to prove their case by giving data, can you prove your 60-mile experience’s data? It is truly amazing stuff if it happened but it is highly unlikely to, especially with a Nextel phone’s power restrictions and the FCC’s restrictions.
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jrfdsf

Sep 18, 2007, 3:19 PM
60 miles? 🤨 Darn! There goes my throwdown with cellphonesaretools! ☹️
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cellphonesaretools

Sep 19, 2007, 7:31 AM
I'm tempted to make the 350-mile drive back to that exact spot (N38º 4.138' W122º 58.295') and see if I can duplicate "The 44-Mile Happening". I'll bet dinner at Claim Jumper that my phone will acquire signal there, given the same weather conditions present when I was there before. Then we could mark that spot for annual pilgrimages of the Nextel faithful once the iDEN network is either decomissioned or falls into enemy hands (other than Sprint, I mean).
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nextel18

Sep 19, 2007, 8:37 AM
In addition, if you do, make sure you write everything down overall trace menu when it comes to the TX side. IDEN will not be going away for some time.
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jrfdsf

Sep 19, 2007, 3:03 PM
2012 is the latest I've heard.
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nextel18

Sep 19, 2007, 3:06 PM
Yes, but it could be extended or cut depending on circumstances. It is not that expensive anymore to maintain the IDEN network the only problem, however, has to deal with the Dual modes, Boost’s great performance, and the continued IDEN losses.
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jrfdsf

Sep 19, 2007, 3:15 PM
If iDEN is losing money, then wouldn't it be more expensive to maintain it?
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nextel18

Sep 20, 2007, 6:18 AM
Overall IDEN isn’t losing money, because of the maintain the their core high paying subscribers, as well as the Boost great performance and current base. They only pay from $2-2.5 billion on capital expenditures. As the losses get bigger than that is when the problems could happen. Those dual mode phones also use the Nextel network, which allows them to collect fees from.
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jrfdsf

Sep 20, 2007, 3:30 PM
Do you think the hybrids are just for now, until QChat comes in 2008, or do you see both products being made for awhile?

I've heard it several different ways; I've heard when QChat phones come out, the only phones that will be offered will be strictly iDEN, and the QChat phones.

I've also heard the iDEN only phones will be history by this time next year, leaving only hybrids & QChat's.

I've also heard ALL THREE will be manufactured for awhile. What's the scoop?
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nextel18

Sep 20, 2007, 3:47 PM
Well I can only say what I think because if I say factual then I would be in trouble. It just depends on many factors. If the dual mode devices start to do well and that is what Nextel customers want then obviously they will continue to roll out with those kind of devices, and continue to push the Nextel side of the PTT product. When Qchat comes about, those devices (PTT on the Nextel side, the Dual Mode) will continue to produce and again it depends on what the customer is telling what they want. There will always be a need for the PTT on the Nextel side because of certain customers need it, but if they feel that Qchat and even the Dual Mode phones are better, then obviously they will start to focus more on what the customers want. I think ...
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jrfdsf

Sep 20, 2007, 4:49 PM
nextel18 said:
... I think all three will be with us for a while.


That's kinda the way I was thinking, too. Makes sense, because Sprint probably wants to offer a broad selection to appeal to many different customers. A regular Nextel for the purists, a hybrid for those who want the "best" of both worlds, and the QChat, for those ready for an all-Sprint phone with the same functionality (and hopefully, coverage) of PCS.

Will be interesting to see.
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nextel18

Sep 20, 2007, 4:53 PM
Yea. Now the overlap is 80% so the more the better. Just depends on which customer wants what.
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jrfdsf

Sep 20, 2007, 4:55 PM
nextel18 said:
Yea. Now the overlap is 80% so the more the better. Just depends on which customer wants what.


When will the overlap make it into the 90's? Being stuck in the 80's is for member's only.
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nextel18

Sep 20, 2007, 5:32 PM
It was in the 70s earlier this year and then now it hit 80s. I probably think, depending on how fast they work, could be probably within a year. Keyword; Within. Again depending on circumstances.
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jrfdsf

Sep 20, 2007, 5:42 PM
One year! Wow! 😲 Once they do achieve a nearly complete overlap, coverage for the hybrids will be pretty good. Remember, it will be Sprint coverage (plus a little PCS roaming).

When you look at the coverage maps, hybrid coverage (iDEN + PCS) looks good. Once both are together, it will be. I think a lot of folks don't realize that iDEN only areas SOON will become PCS as well.

Another thing is that roaming coverage is often not as precise, and in reality isn't as solid as the coverage maps make it out to be.
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nextel18

Sep 20, 2007, 5:46 PM
Well they started at 70% the beginning of the year and now almost end of 07 at 80%. I doubt it will be a year but given their issues they have been having, it might take longer. The Consensus Plan is causing major issues and the co-locating is a similar process. Although on the co-locating, you are not dealing with SMR providers.

Coverage maps unfortunately mean not much because I think it is key for the consumer to actually use the device for themselves because it may vary. In addition, bars is a misconception in the marketplace and people do not understand that bars do not matter.
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jrfdsf

Sep 19, 2007, 3:02 PM
cellphonesaretools said:
I'm tempted to make the 350-mile drive back to that exact spot (N38º 4.138' W122º 58.295') and see if I can duplicate "The 44-Mile Happening". I'll bet dinner at Claim Jumper that my phone will acquire signal there...


Claim Jumper? What kind of food do they serve? 🤤
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