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Clearwire Finally Commits to LTE

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One big mistake

Tofuchong

Aug 3, 2011, 3:58 PM
2.5Ghz spectrum will not give you signal in your house, and the signal is usually very poor inside structures. Not a good move to use that specrum for this.
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MileHigh8710

Aug 3, 2011, 4:43 PM
What would you propose they do better?
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Tofuchong

Aug 3, 2011, 5:36 PM
I would propose that they use a Spectrum frequency that has the ability to penetrate walls and buildings better. Nothing else, really. I think its great that they are offering this, but with the indoor problems that everybody knows WiMAX has, will deploying LTE using the same spectrum be worth it? Or will it simply drive customers to another carrier that has LTE deployed in more advantageous Spectrum, like 1700Mhz, or 700Mhz.
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MileHigh8710

Aug 3, 2011, 6:06 PM
But where I was going with the question is, What other spectrum that they own or that is not own by AT&T and Verizon can they use that will penetrate buildings?

Now I agree with you that it is a poor signal but its ok/subpar. Now I think they get their advantage from not throttling and offering an unlimited plan against their competitors, oh and no contract perhaps.

Those are the things that is keeping me with clear and away from the others. I recently started using bit torrent but only a little. I download most of my music through iTunes still. But I stream a lot of TV from Hulu.com every other month or so, and for that reason I don't want billshock.com 😳 happening to me.
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Tofuchong

Aug 3, 2011, 6:41 PM
I really thought that they would have more spectrum than that. Their website states the following:


"Clearwire’s “LTE 2X” moves information in 20×20 MHz blocks, twice the size of other carriers. That’s why our download speeds are so much faster than theirs (which average only 5 Mbps to 12 Mbps).

Because our 4G network has more spectrum than anyone, we can use a wider range of channels to deliver faster connections. It’s like the number of lanes on a freeway. We have more lanes, which means we can move more traffic at higher speeds."

They were probably refering to tonnes of 2.5Ghz spectrum, which is what I am thinking now. I also thought that the US maximum for channeling is 10 Mhz, but I could be wron...
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MileHigh8710

Aug 3, 2011, 6:52 PM
Yes you are right on the fourth paragraph of yours. So unfortunately is not really much they can do about the building penetration in the short run 😕
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dave73

Aug 5, 2011, 5:28 AM
MileHigh8710 said:
But where I was going with the question is, What other spectrum that they own or that is not own by AT&T and Verizon can they use that will penetrate buildings?

Now I agree with you that it is a poor signal but its ok/subpar. Now I think they get their advantage from not throttling and offering an unlimited plan against their competitors, oh and no contract perhaps.

Those are the things that is keeping me with clear and away from the others. I recently started using bit torrent but only a little. I download most of my music through iTunes still. But I stream a lot of TV from Hulu.com every other month or so, and for that reason I don't want billshock.com 😳 happening to me.


The ...
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WiWavelength

Aug 5, 2011, 2:11 PM
dave73 said:
They also have the SMR band (Nextel), but the licenses for that is for small amounts of spectrum (not enough to launch a fast network).


Nope, the SMR 800 MHz band was heavily interleaved prior to reconfiguration. After rebanding, which consolidates those interleaved licenses into much larger blocks, Sprint Nextel retains ~14 MHz contiguous bandwidth (7 MHz uplink, 7 MHz downlink). That would be sufficient bandwidth to deploy several smaller LTE carrier channels (e.g. four 1.4 MHz channels or one 5 MHz channel and one 1.4 MHz channel).

AJ
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WiWavelength

Aug 3, 2011, 11:19 PM
Tofuchong said:
2.5Ghz spectrum will not give you signal in your house, and the signal is usually very poor inside structures. Not a good move to use that specrum for this.


Get used to it. Once everyone and his dog is using 4G, do you want to still have consistently high data speeds? If yes, then only BRS 2500/2600 MHz spectrum has sufficient bandwidth (~120 MHz) to support that level of service.

AJ
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Slammer

Aug 4, 2011, 9:06 AM
---" 2.5Ghz spectrum will not give you signal in your house"---

I live a mile and a half from a tower and indeed have a good signal in my house. So WiMAX does work in houses.

---" the signal is usually very poor inside structures."---

This is dependant on how close or far the transmitting tower is from structures. It is true that 2.5Ghz does not have the distance advantage of the lower frequencies and cannot penetrate structures as easily However, I have found that the areas I frequent with 4G, have not proposed any major issues. The 2.5Ghz frequency has delivered my mobile broadband very nicely.

---" Not a good move to use that specrum for this."---

Because of my experiences above, I haven't found an indication that it is no...
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crood

Aug 4, 2011, 1:45 PM
For one, a lot of companies won't allow smartphones to access their secure WiFi networks, except possibly those they issue themselves.
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