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Clearwire Achieves 90Mbps Downloads in LTE Tests

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Verizon's numbers

Menno

Oct 20, 2010, 3:13 PM
were assuming full, or near full network load.

Clearwire announced peaks.

I'm sure they were faster anyway, but what will their speeds fall to under full load?
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DroidDev

Oct 20, 2010, 3:35 PM
Speed under load depends on available bandwidth. Clearwire has it more than Verizon.
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Menno

Oct 20, 2010, 3:39 PM
Assuming all frequencies are equal, yes. but the thing is they're not the same. Clearwire has more spectrum, but that spectrum isn't as efficient as Verizon's.

Verizon's also not looking at selling off spectrum to try and fund the network. My brother has clearwire, I am very impressed with their service, but they have serious bandwidth and capacity issues already, let alone when they get faster.
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DroidDev

Oct 20, 2010, 4:08 PM
Verizon has spectrum on 700MHz which has good building penetration and should be good for cities but bandwidth is limited there. Will be slow under high load. Clearwire has more spectrum on 2.5GHz with can handle more data but has building penetration is not good. Will require more towers and microcells. That is what they are doing in NYC.
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Menno

Oct 20, 2010, 4:21 PM
Building penetration isn't the only thing. 700 mhz is also MUCH more efficient at handline data and the towers are more resistant to overload.

I'll let Cellstudent explain it as he knows more about the Spectrum than I do.

Long story short: Higher spectrum is better for faster peak data, but loses that edge fast once you go rural or in high urban areas.
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Versed

Oct 20, 2010, 7:53 PM
And thats not even including AT&T's LTE spectrum which is the same as VZW's, I'm sure some kind of roaming agreement would come into play. That is a large mountain for Clear/Sprint to overcome.
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CellStudent

Oct 20, 2010, 9:22 PM
Menno said:
I'll let Cellstudent explain it as he knows more about the Spectrum than I do.


Well, if you insist....

I think this is the third time I've had to repost this data for the same stinking reason.

Phonescoop ought to put me on the payroll or something...

https://www.phonescoop.com/carriers/forum.php?fm=m&f ... »
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Menno

Oct 20, 2010, 9:33 PM
This is why Epik and I are working on a website.. Just link people to it. 😛
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Slammer

Oct 21, 2010, 7:30 AM
The decision to insert our discussion into your post renders one of two conclusive thoughts.

1) To show an example of a fine debate or,

2) To treat me as a cheap whore.

I'm not exactly sure which one to recognize here.

😁

Seriously though, I think it is important to realize the advantages and disadvantages of both frequencies. Individuals outside of geek world, won't know of, or even understand tech jabber. More than most people on these forums, you personally, know that the 700 Mhz spectrum is a happy medium but not immune to complications that higher frequencies are better equipped for.

I support the higher frequencies for the delivery of data transfer. There are two ways to look at efficiency. While 2.5Ghz may not be...
(continues)
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CellStudent

Oct 21, 2010, 9:44 AM
It doesn't do much good to give an answer without a question. I didn't feel like re-writing the question last night.

Sorry.

BTW, I did take the time to admit that 2.5 GHz clearly has the better transfer rates. I'm a scientist, not a fanboy. Clearwire has a valid business model and valid technology to implement it with.
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Snapper314

Oct 20, 2010, 5:17 PM
I know for a fact that the numbers Verizon is putting out are the extremely LOW end of the results they are seeing.

Even in poor RF enviornments, they are getting speeds of around 19Mb/s to 25Mb/s.

😛

They decided to use these low numbers to cover any and all potential performance results.
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carmodboy99

Oct 20, 2010, 5:37 PM
Uh, something to keep in mind... Clearwire was also testing WIMAX prior to switching its legacy network over from 3G and in its tests they peaked at 70Mbps. Clear has also reiterated over and over again that the speed has been throttled back and is able to be increased at will. I imagine the stability or reliability might be affected at higher speeds than the 4Mbps they run now, but in any case, higher speeds than the 5 to 12 Mbps that Verizon announced (only to one up Clear, also throttled back results). Capacity isnt an issue for Clear, as they have bandwidth in spades (and would definitely need every bit of it if Clear were to pick up in popularity as it is 2.5Mhz)So maybe they will switch over, maybe not. Either way, both companies ar...
(continues)
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DiamondPro

Oct 20, 2010, 10:04 PM
You my friend have nailed it! I couldn't have said it better myself. While companies like tmobile continuous post there theoretical hspa+ speeds of 21mbs which is not real world speed.

Sprint advertises 3 to 6mbs with max of over 10mbs not the theoretical speed of 70mbs.The theoretical max of verizons lte is 100mbs with a 10sec latency. Those numbers will be a lot lower during load. This is why Sprint is the Now Network they already have 4g and Big Red is still playing ketchup! 😎
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ScribeD

Oct 20, 2010, 11:58 PM
... a few quick tidbits.

The first is in regards to technology. When the various carriers were making the various decisions over which 4G technologies would reign supreme (Ok, I just watched the Iron Chef, sue me 😛), there were three really. LTE, WiMax, and UMB.

Verizon and Sprint both, initially, considered going with UMB. It is more spectral efficient, faster, and has a slightly larger scalability than LTE. However, it was designed by the netwrok system bugaboo of the world, Qualcomm. In other words, Europe and other GSM camp would never approve it. Therefor, the largest backer of UMB moved to what the GSM (3GPP) world wished, LTE. In essence, this killed UMB and forced Sprint's hand.

I wont start a who is better at what...
(continues)
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Milosh

Oct 22, 2010, 11:01 AM
Yeah! What he said. *riding on coat-tails*
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