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Qualcomm Gives Up On UMB, Switches to LTE

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no comment? this is huge!

Rich Brome

Nov 13, 2008, 4:54 PM
I'm shocked no one has commented yet. This is huge. Not a huge surprise, but still huge. Qualcomm - the CDMA company - has essentially given up on CDMA.

This is way bigger than when they gave up on EVDV, and that was a big deal.

Now it's basically done; there will be one global standard for all phones: LTE.

Of course, LTE incorporates many CDMA technologies, and Qualcomm will do just fine making LTE chips... but the era of two major, incompatible technology "camps" competing against each other seems to be drawing to a close.
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tnt2k1

Nov 13, 2008, 5:00 PM
the market has spoken
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BigShowJB

Nov 13, 2008, 5:19 PM
I'd have commented sooner myself, but I'm just now catching a break to look at phonescoop.

I have 3 questions about this article...


So who is going to be making UMB chips, if anyone, now?

What does this mean for the future of CDMA based technologies.

Who is making WiMax chipsand how does this affect them and Sprint?
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Rich Brome

Nov 13, 2008, 5:38 PM
BigShowJB said:
So who is going to be making UMB chips, if anyone, now?

No one, that I know of. UMB is dead.

What does this mean for the future of CDMA based technologies.

There's EVDO Rev. B, but I have my doubts about that technology as well. Either Rev. A or Rev. B will be the "end of the road" for CDMA. The "upgrade path" beyond EVDO will be LTE (or maybe mobile WiMAX).

Who is making WiMax chipsand how does this affect them and Sprint?

In a way, this is a small boost to WiMAX. There are some smaller CDMA carriers around the world still undecided about 4G. Before today, they technically had three choices: UMB, WiMAX, or LTE. Now it's just WiMAX or ...
(continues)
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terryjohnson16

Nov 13, 2008, 8:00 PM
Why is Sprint being so stubborn and sticking with Wi-Max. LTE would be better since most carriers will be using it. Was that Dan's choice?
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Slammer

Nov 13, 2008, 8:59 PM
What price will the consumers have to pay? Right now where I live, there are three choices of high speed internet. If two of those companies go away, I see a price hike. Same as with LTE. what limitations will there be? While all carriers may offer LTE, It is my understanding that an organization controls it. What regulations would there be to keep the price into check. If the organization that controls LTE decides to bask in profits, Who would pay for this? I would think consumers would hope to have WiMax as a price limiter. I am a consumer looking in and having only one choice scares me. Especially in a young industry as the wireless world. In a sense, this indeed is a monopoly. Can any one clarify?
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Rich Brome

Nov 13, 2008, 11:05 PM
No, it's not really like that.

LTE was developed very much by standards groups, not any one company.

Also, while everyone has been busy crafting the LTE standard in recent years, there have been patent wars going on at the same time. The Qualcomm / Broadcom battle(s) alone have been a huge wake-up call to the industry that even standards like GSM and WCDMA are subject to companies making broad intellectual property claims. No one wants that to happen again with LTE, and so they've been working pro-actively to prevent it:

https://www.phonescoop.com/news/item.php?n=2937 »

...which is one of many reasons so many carriers are eager to commit to LTE. If there weren't clarity on the patent and licensing issues, LTE would not be as popula...
(continues)
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CamelTowing

Nov 14, 2008, 5:28 PM
you mean like what qualcom has done for years?
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eric_cartman

Nov 13, 2008, 9:01 PM
There is some potential for WiMax.

It doesn't necessary have to be a 'phone' technology just because it is wireless. It can be an alternative to WiFi, for people with laptops to get data anywhere (current 3G is slow, WiMax could be DSL/cable speed, or higher).

Problem is, they decided to only start the service in Baltimore, and Baltimore only. They are expanding, but if they started that business with service in ATLEAST 5 or 7 cities (NYC, LA, Chicago, and such), it would have been more noticed by now.
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Rich Brome

Nov 13, 2008, 10:52 PM
I agree completely.

But... where does that leave Sprint for a 4G phone technology?
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en102

Nov 14, 2008, 2:06 AM
Somewhat uncommitted.

For a phone, they'll probably milk out EV-DO Rev A with VoIP. WiMAX is in its infancy (few devices, even less coverage).
If Sprint is serious about WiMAX for 4G handsets, they'll deploy it.

Sprint has typically had poor timing for market delivery (i.e. deploying ahead of the curve, eating a lot of cost before demand is there).
One can hope that WiMAX outside of handsets works in their favor.
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Azeron

Nov 14, 2008, 11:27 PM
I wish I had Hesse's job. Rebuilding Sprint involves low expectations and the potential for high rewards. It can be done, but is Hesse creative enough to get the job done?
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japhy

Nov 13, 2008, 5:48 PM
My first thought was to say something that could have easily been interpreted as "Haw haw - CDMA is teh suXXX0rz", but decided against it, because there was no point. Being an employee of AT&T doesn't mean I support LTE or believe it's a superior technology - it's just the next version. Cell phones are still going to have a range of cool features (most of which won't work nearly as well as they're supposed to), signal will continue to be improved (but will still be unreliable in all places except hwy 522 at the Snohomish river, which drops calls without fail), and the world will keep on spinnin'.

However, on further reflection: this does mean that the longstanding CDMA vs GSM conflict is over, and in a few years, the embers of th...
(continues)
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HawkeyeOC

Nov 13, 2008, 6:16 PM
There was a time long ago when analog reigned supreme and dinosaurs roamed the earth 🤣 .

The choices were so simple then..this carrier or that carrier. We could always count on our outrageously priced "brick phones" to work on any carrier out there...probably all 2 of them 🤣

Now we have appeared to come full circle hopefully with LTE...

Wouldn't the world be a better place if this could happen 😎
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Pink Jazz

Nov 13, 2008, 10:26 PM
There were actually two major analog standards - AMPS (and its TACS and ETACS variants) and NMT. AMPS/TACS/ETACS were used in most of the Americas and mainland Europe, while NMT was primarily used in the Nordic Countries and Russia.
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terryjohnson16

Nov 13, 2008, 7:58 PM
Has T-Mobile USA mentioned if/when they will go to LTE?
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eric_cartman

Nov 13, 2008, 9:03 PM
They are planning trails...in Germany. Thing is, T-Mobile tries out their new technology in Germany or UK, and when their trials become successful, then deploy it in other markets (like USA). So my guess is around 2011-2014.

Besides, they just started 3G here, why jump out already?!
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terryjohnson16

Nov 14, 2008, 1:17 AM
I am wondering if they are talking about T-Mobile USA. DT is already advanced in the 3G field, so they will get LTE first. The way T-Mo USA has proven themselves in moving slow, they won't have LTE until 2012. I would really surprised if they made an announcement and said they will have it by 2010, or 2011. They could be quietly upgrading and putting WCDMA/LTE equipment in now, to be ready for the future, so they don't have to deal with the crap that is going on now with replacing EDGE with 3G equipment in many areas.
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CamelTowing

Nov 14, 2008, 5:24 PM
Yeah Rich... looks like gsm won. I know that LTE isnt "gsm" but it's definitely in the family. I wonder how all those people who argued endlessly about how cdma was this and that feel about finally being proven wrong...

How many people got banned over thew forum wars on that subject?
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Rich Brome

Nov 14, 2008, 6:05 PM
Well... LTE is vastly superior to GSM, so the people claiming GSM was inferior weren't necessarily wrong at the time.

In fact, with WCDMA and now LTE, the "GSM camp" has adopted many concepts and technologies from CDMA. Not all, of course, but part of what makes LTE so great is that they essentially took all of the best ideas and put them into one standard.

The GSM "side" may have "won", but I wouldn't say that makes GSM's detractors "wrong", especially if you're referring to arguments that happened before LTE had even been demonstrated.
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