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Next Version of 5G Standard Finalized

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Jul 7, 2020, 11:33 AM   by Rich Brome   @rbrome

The 3GPP has finalized Release 16, the first major update to the 5G NR standard (Release 15). The new standard has the potential to boost data speeds by supporting new radio frequency bands, and has new features that should improve battery life in 5G devices. The most important new feature is NR-U, which is support for 5G NR operating in unlicensed spectrum, such as that used for Wi-Fi. This includes the new 6 GHz band, a huge new swath of radio waves that just became available for unlicensed use in the US. Release 16 includes support for three different configurations of NR-U: standalone, LAA (license assisted access) where the unlicensed band is an additional carrier to augment a 5G network, or LAA with a 4G LTE network. Another key new feature in Release 16 is wake-up signal (WUS), a new way for a 5G device to "listen" for incoming transmissions when idle, that uses less power. Release 16 also improves cellular positioning, which can be used together with systems like GPS to provide faster and more accurate location data. Finally, integrated access and backhaul (IAB) allows mmWave base stations to be used as both wireless access and backhaul, thereby eliminating the need for new fiber optic lines when densifying a mmWave 5G network.

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rwalford79

Jul 7, 2020, 1:56 PM

But this line says it all

" Finally, integrated access and backhaul (IAB) allows mmWave base stations to be used as both wireless access and backhaul, thereby eliminating the need for new fiber optic lines when densifying a mmWave 5G network." - If anyone knows anything about MESH networking, which is essentially this is, bouncing data signals from one cell site to another without using any independent backhaul actually cuts data transmission speeds sometimes up to half. Im basing this on WiFi Mesh Terminals, but it goes without saying, bouncing anything across multiple towers that have users on each tower not only seems like a really cheap deployment for mobile companies, it also means we can expect less fiber to each cell site which translates to again, cheap depl...
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