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Google Trialing ART to Replace Dalvik on Android Phones

Article Comments  2  

Nov 7, 2013, 8:09 AM   by Eric M. Zeman   @zeman_e

Google is testing a new runtime for the Android operating system that it hopes will eventually replace the Dalvik runtime that currently powers Android. Dalvik is a just-in-time (JIT) compiler that helps applications function on Android hardware. It requires apps to be compiled each time they are run. This process includes a lot of overhead and isn't the most efficient way to run apps. The new environment for apps is called Android Runtime, or ART. It is an ahead-of-time (AOT) compiler that translates apps into machine code when they are first installed. The process should be more efficient and will lead to Android's ability to run actual native applications. ART is available in Android 4.4 KitKat on the Nexus 5. Developers can switch their KitKat device to use ART instead of Dalvik. According to Google, it is offering this early access to ART to get early developer and partner feedback on how well ART works. Google did not say if or when ART will actually replace Dalvik on Android devices.

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Zpike

Nov 7, 2013, 10:17 PM

That is Awesome!

That is Awesome!
Riot Jr.

Nov 7, 2013, 10:02 PM
edited

Just about time

This will make both, the apps to run faster, and to use less RAM when executed. We'll see IOS like performance in mid range Android devices running KitKat (if not supperior).

I don't think if this will affect the way in which Android Apps are developed. Building apps for IOS in objective C is quite complicated, building apps for Android is way easier the way that it is right now.
 
 
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