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Prison Heads Ask FCC for Permission to Jam Cell Signals

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It's funny that ...

bones boy

Jul 14, 2009, 1:23 PM
... the prisons can't do their job and control what comes in and out of the jails, so (potentially) others (those who live near a prison) will have lousy, or no, cell service. Way to go, prisons! Rolling Eyes
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crood

Jul 14, 2009, 2:14 PM
No, actually it's funny that a person with no idea of the difficulties and complexities of a job will accuse people of not doing their job because they're not 100% effective.

Should airport security be denied X-Ray and metal detectors because actually searching people isn't 100% effective?

Should police be denied the ability to identify DNA because fingerprints aren't reliable?

That's what you're advocating. Technology that would make them able to do their jobs better should be denied because they can't make do with older methods.
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Disrespect

Jul 14, 2009, 2:58 PM
Thats not what he is saying at all. He is saying that because they cant do their job, they want to make others suffer just so they can punish prisoners which who only going to start using LAND LINES in the prison.

Don't you understand that the only way that stuff gets in is because some of the guards are getting paid and taking under the table money. So jamming cell signals are not going to STOP it will only alter the direction of the prisoners outside communication method.

Airports that use X-ray's don't harm or assess a negative impact on surrounding neighborhoods like jamming cell signals will.
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acdc1a

Jul 14, 2009, 3:46 PM
More importantly is if we start granting prisons the right to jam signals, what other government entities will we give the ability to? It's a slippery slope.
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murmermer

Jul 14, 2009, 4:03 PM
True, now that you mention it- I have changed my mind. After they allow prison's to block Cell signal the schools will be next(example)... so you are right- the prison's should do their job and if guards get caught smuggling in contraband they should be punished harshly.
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jskrenes

Jul 15, 2009, 10:41 AM
The guards ARE punished harshly for smuggling contraband in. So are visitors. Do you guys have any idea how much a cell phone is worth on the inside? Smuggle a carton of cigarettes in and you could be paid hundreds or thousands of dollars. Cell phones are even more. A few cell phones smuggled in will make your mortgage payments for a year.

And yes, jamming signals would only shift the form of secretive communication to landlines, letters, and visitors. But landline calls and visits can be recorded and letters read (granted much of this communication happens in code, but code can be broken), and if letters are intercepted illegally, they are considered contraband.

I say go for it if there is no collateral damage to surrounding residents...
(continues)
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bones boy

Jul 14, 2009, 4:28 PM
Your analogies are way off. Jamming cell phone signals in prisons is not tantamount to x-raying people boarding flights or using DNA in crime situations. It's not even close.

Tip from an older guy - analogies rarely make a valid point. It's very difficult to compare apples to mangoes.
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PapaBell

Jul 14, 2009, 4:31 PM
FYI- Most prisons have civilian employees (counselors, clerks, healthcare staff etc.) Some prisoners (many) are sociopathic and 'seduce' & recruit from the civilian crew. Xrays and cavity searches have not been SOP for civilian staff. That may have change. Even a cellphone fan-folk might hesitate at a Nokia suppository.
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Disrespect

Jul 14, 2009, 5:09 PM
What? Eh?
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