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printed October 24, 2014
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Review: Motorola Triumph

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Is It Your Type? Body The Three S's  

From a distance, it would be easy to mistake the Triumph for a Droid X. It has the same large, rectangular footprint and somewhat plain styling. Wrapped in stealthy matte-black plastic, the Triumph could make a black hole look bright. It is wide and blocky, and just barely manages to come in under 1cm thick at 9.9mm. The angled edges help decrease the Triumph's footprint in your pocket just enough so that it doesn't feel like carrying around a bar of gold.

 

Click a thumbnail above for a larger view.

The Triumph is a bit on the weighty side and feels dense enough so that it might do some damage it if were to be hurled at a window or your ex (but please don't throw it at anyone.) The build quality is excellent, and the Triumph feels like it belongs anywhere but in a pre-paid carrier's lineup.

The display devours the lion's share of the front fascia of the Triumph. The typical Android controls take the form of capacitive buttons below the display. They worked with no problem.

The power/lock button is on the left edge. This is an awkward spot as far as I am concerned; I would prefer it on the top of the phone. Worse, the button is really small. Thankfully it has good travel and feedback. The volume toggle is on the right edge of the phone, also near the top. It, too, is a bit on the small side. Travel and feedback of the toggle is complete mush, and feels like flattening a french fry on a table with your finger.

The top houses the 3.5mm headset jack, which is right where I like it to be. The microUSB port and (surprise!) microHDMI port are both on the bottom edge of the phone. The HDMI port makes it easier to display content on devices such as HDTVs.

The battery cover slides off with a bit of downward pressure, providing access to the battery and memory card slot. The microSD card can be removed without taking the battery out, which is always a plus.

Overall, the Triumph may have looks on the plain side, but the hardware covers the basics without taking any shortcuts.

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