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printed November 28, 2015
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Review: LG GS505 Sentio

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Is It Your Type? Body The Three S's Touch  


The Sentio has a 3-inch display measuring 240 by 400 pixels. For me, this is too small and too few pixels. It leaves little room on the screen for icons, applications, and text. I won't say that things feel squished, but it is definitely tight. The resolution is such that text, icons and graphics all have rough edges and sometimes appear "out of focus" or soft. It also isn't very bright. It is readable indoors, but outside it is almost impossible to see. You have to seek out shade or a shadow to see anything on the display outside. That gets old quick. The Sentio's display works, but doesn't impress.


The Sentio performed admirably when it came to collecting T-Mobile's EDGE/3G signal. Most times I checked the status indicator, it had a full 5 bars to report. Very seldom did it dip down to 2 or 3 bars. I did, however, lose the 3G connection and fall back to T-Mobile's EDGE network in an area with questionable coverage. That only happened once, though. In my experience, the signal never played a role in the Sentio's ability to connect or receive phone calls. I didn't drop any calls when using it. Data sessions were almost universally slow, however. Despite the 3G network, web sites were slow, slow, slow to load. In side-by-side tests, almost every other 3G T-Mobile device I have on hand bested the Sentio in terms of data speeds.


Phone calls through the Sentio were muddy at best. There was lots of static, hiss, and the sound occasionally dropped out completely for a second or two. Voices in the earpiece sounded muffled and digitized. Those with whom I spoke reported similar issues on their end. This means the Sentio is not a great voice device. The good news is that the volume of the earpiece, ringers, and speakerphone is bombastically loud. You can make the Sentio loud enough to tick off someone like Eddie Van Halen.


The Sentio's battery fared pretty well. In my tests, I was easily able to eke two days out of it, with plenty of calls and messaging. Turning on the Bluetooth will steal about half a day, however, as will extended use of the music player. Used sparingly, you could conceivably get through an entire weekend without a charge, but that might be pushing it. It's best to plan on charging every other night.

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