Home  ›  News  ›

Finland Chooses 1800MHz for LTE

Article Comments  

all discussions

show all 15 replies

Figures...

mycool

Apr 24, 2009, 3:07 PM
A huge majority of the carriers globally (US included) choose LTE, yet they can't agree on a band.

When will there be an official standard so that it's literally any device on any network?
...
Versed

Apr 24, 2009, 3:15 PM
I was thinking the same thing, but I also think its about time chip makers should be able to make either multi-freq radios, or an adaptive chip design for each locality.

And please don't say it can't be done, it is already done in non-mobile phone radios. I just don't think the research or want to do anything is far more then can't.
...
dave73

Apr 26, 2009, 3:24 AM
Versed said:
I was thinking the same thing, but I also think its about time chip makers should be able to make either multi-freq radios, or an adaptive chip design for each locality.

And please don't say it can't be done, it is already done in non-mobile phone radios. I just don't think the research or want to do anything is far more then can't.


I read on another site (at least 2 years ago)that phone makers were looking at making the frequency bands work software based, rather than hardware based. That way, if another frequency band is needed, then the new band could be added to the phone, rather than the phone not being able to access the new band. I only wish I remember where I read it at.
...
WiWavelength

Apr 24, 2009, 5:12 PM
mycool said:
A huge majority of the carriers globally (US included) choose LTE, yet they can't agree on a band.


Simply put, no universal block of spectrum is available (or able to be cleared) across all countries.

When will there be an official standard so that it's literally any device on any network?


Just short of never.

AJ
...
pauldg

Apr 25, 2009, 11:29 AM
I get the feeling that this isn't over, and we'll see more than 3 frequency bands for LTE by the time it's rolled out.

Think about it: GSM is on 4 bands already, UMTS/HSPA is on 5 bands (850/900/1700/1900/2100).

So to have a truly global phone you would want quadband GSM, 5-band 3G, and at least tri band 4G. That's a lot of radios, not even including BT, WiFi, or GPS.
...
BigShowJB

Apr 25, 2009, 7:00 PM
and don't forget wimax
...
Versed

Apr 25, 2009, 7:40 PM
BigShowJB said:
and don't forget wimax


Wimax=BetaMax
...
dave73

Apr 26, 2009, 3:27 AM
Versed said:


Wimax=BetaMax


Unless WiMax catches on with other carriers, then it might not matter. Besides, at least in the US, Clearwire (Sprint) is using WiMax, and it's in the 2.5ghz band. Whether Sprint lauches it in the PCS band is unknown yet. For now, they're not using PCS for WiMax.
...
Rich Brome

Apr 26, 2009, 11:16 AM
The only thing that can be consolidated or unified is technology, not frequency bands.

On the technology side, we are finally moving to one global standard, and that's LTE. It's actually very exciting.

As far as frequency bands, radio spectrum a precious resource. As more people use phones, and use more data, we need more spectrum to handle that. That means more bands, not fewer. In any part of the world where you have a frequency band dedicated to phones, the mobile companies using it have typically paid billions to license it, and they're not going to throw that away... ever.

In the US, the 850 and 1900 bands won't go away when CDMA and GSM die; those bands will be instead be used for new technologies like LTE. We can look ...
(continues)
...
knoxvegas75

Apr 26, 2009, 2:33 PM
LTE is a wonderful step in the right direction. It will provide uniform device creation and allow for 3rd part support and consolidation of the industry. No doubt the frequency issue is one not solved by making countries use a certain world standard frequency (never going to happen for reasons you stated)

Now if we can just get a radio built that can support all frequencies and use software to tune in and receive the frequency we would be away from the "X-Band" phone hardware requirements for global roaming.

We as a world society need to embrace the global marketplace we live in and create products, especially the ones we rely on for our communication with the rest of the world, that are able to move where ever we go. The world i...
(continues)
...
WiWavelength

Apr 27, 2009, 11:33 AM
knoxvegas75 said:
Now if we can just get a radio built that can support all frequencies and use software to tune in and receive the frequency we would be away from the "X-Band" phone hardware requirements for global roaming.


That is a pipe dream.

Software defined radio does not overcome the limitation that such devices still must have one or more antennas (physically or electrically) optimized for each & every desired radio frequency band. That force runs counter to the one driving consumer's fervor for increasingly cheaper, smaller phones w/ wholly internal antennas.

AJ
...
terryjohnson16

Apr 26, 2009, 6:08 PM
Why did they chose the 2600MHz band. Coverage would be poor even more than what we have here on the 1900MHz band. That is a high band that will need more towers.

Also, how do they get by with using the 2100 for coverage overseas, when we here in the US need the 850 to reach places where the 1900 can't travel and penetrate well?
...
dave73

Apr 26, 2009, 7:14 PM
I don't know the answer to that one. Europe doesn't seem to want to make an effort to unify a frequency band with the world. When The FCC created the AWS band, they were able to use the 2100 band for the downlink with Europe, but they chose the 1900 band for the uplink. We were already using 1900 for PCS before they were. So the best the FCC could do was use the 1700 band for the uplink, and that was what Europe uses for the uplink to the 1800 band.

I don't know if there was 1800 band frequencies that either weren't used at all, or Finland was freeing up for LTE. So the 1800 band they're using might be a different set of 1800 frequencies for this purpose. While not as good as anything under 1000mhz, but better than the EU going wi...
(continues)
...
terryjohnson16

Apr 26, 2009, 7:18 PM
Also, I think in Asia, or some place overseas, they use the 1700MHz band but not the AWS Band 4 1700/2100MHz band.
...
dave73

Apr 26, 2009, 8:52 PM
terryjohnson16 said:
Also, I think in Asia, or some place overseas, they use the 1700MHz band but not the AWS Band 4 1700/2100MHz band.

I believe it's Japan. I don't know about South Korea on their frequency bands.
...
terryjohnson16

Apr 26, 2009, 8:54 PM
Yeah, its Japan.
...

This forum is closed.

Please log in to report a message to the moderator.

This forum is closed.


all discussions

Subscribe to Phone Scoop News with RSS Follow @phonescoop on Twitter Phone Scoop on Facebook Subscribe to Phone Scoop on YouTube Follow on Instagram

 

All content Copyright 2001-2019 Phone Factor, LLC. All Rights Reserved.
Content on this site may not be copied or republished without formal permission.