Phone Scoop

printed July 29, 2015
See this page online at:
http://www.phonescoop.com/forums/forum.php?fm=m&ff=6&fh=27760

Home  ›  Forums  ›

Development

all discussions

Building a cell phone.

mright123

Mar 6, 2004, 5:14 PM
I am interested in several different types of cell phones but I have never found a phone that meets ALL of my needs.

I was reading an article on some website about people who wanted to build their own cell phones and such. Is that possible?

I don't mean so much as in "can it be done?"... Because I am sure that if one has access to the various parts that they could BUT are there rules about such things? Do they HAVE to be regulated? If anyone has any info please respond.

Larry
...
CDGIII

Aug 31, 2004, 11:10 AM
Each ESN would be regulated to ensure each device has a unique ESN. So you would need some way to be granted an ESN range from the FCC.
...
Rich Brome

Sep 2, 2004, 11:34 AM
...or, in the case of a GSM phone, an IMEI number.

Neither of which is regulated by the FCC, AFAIK, but yes, certainly there is some group you would need to such a number from in order for the phone to work.
...
Rich Brome

Sep 2, 2004, 11:42 AM
The FCC must approve all radio devices, but I'm not sure how the rules apply to a device you don't plan to sell commercially.

In reality, if it works, no one's going to come arrest you. No one would know. If you built a GSM phone your carrier probably wouldn't even know, depending on how they treat IMEI numbers.

If you were a very skilled electrical engineer, you could probably build a working phone using a reference design kit as a starting point, for as little as a few thousand dollars.

But it would be a massive thing that wouldn't come close to fitting in your pocket. To build something anywhere near as small as a real phone, you can expect to pay around $50,000 to have a company with the right equipment build you a real, working...
(continues)
...
CDGIII

Sep 3, 2004, 1:02 PM
In CDMA, being an exceptionally skilled EE would give you a neat looking box that did nothing. You'd also need an exceptionally gited software engineer to actually make the box do something with the network.
...
Rich Brome

Sep 3, 2004, 1:23 PM
Not necessarily. What I suggested was starting with a reference design kit, which would include the basic software. All of the major chip makers, including Qualcomm, have reference designs that include hardware and software you can use as a starting point in designing a new phone.

More info:

http://www.cdmatech.com/solutions/products/surf.jsp »

http://www.st.com/cdma/ »

http://cdma-mobile-phone-reference-design.rtx.dk/ »
...
CDGIII

Sep 3, 2004, 1:27 PM
To be honest, first I've ever heard of any platform coming with software. But unless you don't ahve one, you'll still need a custom GUI.
...
CDGIII

Sep 3, 2004, 1:27 PM
Not to mention the tweaks that will need to be done in order to optimize the handset given whatever antenna you choose. You'll still need to tweak the cal tables.
...
ShunAsa

Nov 1, 2004, 9:42 AM
You guys are so technical....such a turn-on Wink
...
Rich Brome

Sep 3, 2004, 1:33 PM
...which is why Windows Mobile and Symbian (including Series 60 and UIQ) are so great. And there are complete, integrated reference designs that include hardware and that software as well.

That's how these no-name Taiwanese and Chinese companies are able to crank out advanced smartphones like crazy. Same with the insanely feature-packed FOMA phones in Japan - most of them use Symbian, which saves them a ton of work, letting them bring more advanced phones to market faster.
...

You must log in to reply.

Please log in to report a message to the moderator.


all discussions

Subscribe to Phone Scoop News with RSS Follow @phonescoop on Twitter Phone Scoop on Facebook Subscribe to Phone Scoop on YouTube Follow on Instagram

 

All content Copyright 2001-2015 Phone Factor, LLC. All Rights Reserved.
Content on this site may not be copied or republished without formal permission.
1