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High RF?

andy2373

May 1, 2009, 5:53 PM
Does higher RF mean better signal?

Over time I’ve heard and read the Moto E815 is the reception king, but it’s not listed on the top 10 list.

Not to get side tracked though, Higher RF = better reception?
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andy2373

May 1, 2009, 5:56 PM
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tmbold

May 7, 2009, 3:44 PM
thats not high RF, thats high radiation
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Midnight Toker

May 6, 2009, 10:33 PM
A higher RF does not necessarily mean better reception. As you increase RF, the amount of wireless towers in a geographical area increase due to the fact the RF wavelength decreases as the RF increases.
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andy2373

May 6, 2009, 11:04 PM
Confused
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Midnight Toker

May 6, 2009, 11:28 PM
If you don't care from my answer and explanation, tough bull turds.
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smiliey

May 14, 2009, 8:50 PM
i think his Confused face is because your answer was confusing.. i didnt really understand it either. can you break it down for all us simple folk please?
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FrankOMCGee

May 15, 2009, 3:54 PM
sounds like that when u amp up the RF signal from the phone it makes the wave longer but not stronger. like when u pull a slinky apart. does not make it any more fun...
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smiliey

May 16, 2009, 12:05 PM
lol
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crammy1

Jun 20, 2009, 8:26 AM
i think what he meant is that high rf would mean the signal would have less area covered so to increase the are u need more towers that would produce the signal...
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jcsj6776

Jun 20, 2009, 8:54 PM
Here is a good analogy. Think of the motorola phone being a little boy maybe 6 to 10yrs of age and the cell site being an adult throwing a baseball (signal) back and forth. Well, the little boy(moto) recv a good RF but when the little boy actually send (throws the ball back to the adult) cell site. It may not be strong enough to actually connect or the little boy can not throw the ball back to the adult (cell site). But to many variables to consider. Like weather, time of day, terrain, and network. Maybe motorola works better on a motorola network vers a Nortel network. Hope this helps
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Rich Brome

May 14, 2009, 10:53 AM
No.

First, RF output (transmit) is only one half of the RF signal performance equation, with reception being the other half. Both are important.

Secondly, if higher power automatically meant better performance, all phones would be designed to operate at the maximum legal limit. That's not the case.

Engineering a phone for optimal signal (RF) performance is extremely complex. It's not just output power or reception gain. Dozens (if not hundreds) of factors affect the signal performance of a particular phone, on a particular network, in a particular location, in a particular situation.
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ecycled

Aug 15, 2009, 2:24 PM
Nokia 6010. I'm just saying. You should check the specs on it, whatever it had. That's what you want :-)
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Gadget Junky

Aug 16, 2009, 7:49 AM
The Motorola E815 was the best non-analogue phone in the US.
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ecycled

Aug 20, 2009, 9:48 AM
Laughing

no way I'm arguing about the best reception phone. However, they should still make both of these phones; motorola e815 and nokia 6010. That would make the population happy.
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Rich Brome

Sep 22, 2009, 2:12 PM
No.

If it were that simple, every phone would be designed to operate at the maximum legal limit. That's not the case, because RF signal performance is much, much more complicated than the simple power output of the radio.
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