Phone Scoop

printed August 1, 2015
See this page online at:
http://www.phonescoop.com/articles/discuss.php?fm=m&ff=7218&fh=2620806

Home  ›  News  ›

No Warrant Needed by Police to Search Phones, Says Calif.

Article Comments  

all discussions

Wow, ridiculous

kvlt_ov_personality

Jan 4, 2011, 2:33 PM
This should be illegal, considering the amount of personaly information that you can get from someone's phone.
...
macosx

Jan 4, 2011, 2:36 PM
only in California, thats why i have data erase on my iphone, one click and POOF! This is going to the supreme court no doubt.
...
tmorep03

Jan 4, 2011, 2:38 PM
ya i agree its going to the supreme court for sure.Idk wat kind of personal information someone is keepin in thier cell phone. i know on mine your not going to find my ssn or any bank account numbers so why does it matter. What they are goin to see my facebook, anyone who has facebook can do that.
...
mycool

Jan 4, 2011, 2:41 PM
Just a thought, sometimes people do sexting... so they could easily see naughty pictures of you and/or your significant other... Oh, and just to clarify, in my example the people are 2 adults who consented to the photos.
...
GeeksAreBest

Jan 4, 2011, 2:41 PM
Nudie pictures of your girlfriend? I sure wouldn't want someone else seeing that in a "routine" search. If I'm pulled over for speeding and it's considered reckless driving, and they haul me in or detain me for 24 hrs just to be dicks...I don't care what's on my phone, I dont think it should be OK to say "I'm a cop, I can do this." Which you *know* will happen. It's california...
...
phatmanxxl

Jan 4, 2011, 3:56 PM
I have access to my bank account and credit card number stored in my phone. Business oriented people can have sensitive info in their BlackBerry that they dont want the police sifting through and accidentally deleting account info or important emails. This is unconstitutional and protected right from search and seizure. Some people use their phone for more than "facebooking", how ignorant can you be.
...
Mark_S

Jan 4, 2011, 2:42 PM
Hope all the 50 states and including Puerto Rico adopt this.
The amount of helpful information stored in phones nowadays that can be used to solve crimes more expeditiously make it a logical choice to implement.
Crying or Very sad Boo-hoo-hoo cry me a river to those that have an issue with it!!! Crying or Very sad
...
bluecoyote

Jan 4, 2011, 2:53 PM
Let's enable law enforcement agencies to track citizens with the built-in GPS 24/7 so we can prevent crimes BEFORE they occur!
...
gldnhrtrblfst

Jan 4, 2011, 3:03 PM
and allow them to listen in on any conversation they choose to. We can give it a really PATRIOTic name. We need to enACT this quickly before the terrorists take are freedom through our phones.
...
SquareCircuit

Jan 4, 2011, 3:20 PM
NICe ..
...
AndroidRules

Jan 4, 2011, 3:15 PM
bluecoyote said:
Let's enable law enforcement agencies to track citizens with the built-in GPS 24/7 so we can prevent crimes BEFORE they occur!


Yeah true. Why not. They're probably already doing it anyway. I'm not conspiracy theorist but think about it
...
Azeron

Jan 5, 2011, 7:09 AM
Even better...we can use CCTV to monitor citizens at all times. In addition we could use their televisions and cell phones to constantly monitor them in their homes and on their commutes. What would Orwell have written had he any idea of cell phones and computers?
...
Versed

Jan 4, 2011, 8:30 PM
Mark_S said:
Hope all the 50 states and including Puerto Rico adopt this.
The amount of helpful information stored in phones nowadays that can be used to solve crimes more expeditiously make it a logical choice to implement.
Crying or Very sad Boo-hoo-hoo cry me a river to those that have an issue with it!!! Crying or Very sad


Yavole Herr Oberstrumbannfuhrer
...
Azeron

Jan 5, 2011, 7:05 AM
It's official. You post just to irritate others. It is possible to post that same opinion without antagonizing others with the dig at the end.
...
DEATH

Jan 4, 2011, 3:58 PM
PASSWORD
...
phatmanxxl

Jan 4, 2011, 4:02 PM
Definitely unconstitutional unless the cop can prove it was used during a crime, and then a search warrent should be issued. I can see some asshole cop arrest me for DWLS and sitting there ****ing with my phone. I would definitely lock it down my phone (I usually have a screen lock active) when being encountered by police in California.
...
Mark_S

Jan 4, 2011, 4:35 PM
Correct. There is an option(s) out there for a long time called passwords, keypad locks, etc.,
The paranoia exhibited by those with persecution complexes is nothing short of hilarious.
Believing that every law enforcement officer is going to pull people over and confiscate cellphones just because they want to now is even more hilarious.
It is the knucklehead local police and state troopers that need to be kept an eye on for abuse of law statutes.
So get your heads out from between your !!@XX's and get your perspectives and facts straight first. Smile
...
nickd

Jan 5, 2011, 10:33 AM
Not every law enforcement officer will but all it takes is a few bad ones.
...
jeffdws

Jan 4, 2011, 7:05 PM
I don't think it's ridiculous to search a phone if there is reason to believe the phone was involved in a crime. It can provide really useful information like time frames and others potential involved with the crime.

I agree it's unconstitutional to search your property without a warrant, and a cell phone is no different. The problem is if this law were ruled unconstitutional, which it probably will be, and the cop really wants to look at your phone, he's going to do get a warrant- potentially detaining you for hours in the process. Warrants aren't always issued in a timely manner. It's allow the cop to see a text you sent to your friend while driving or sit in your car for hours. Pick your poison
...
jeffdws

Jan 4, 2011, 7:06 PM
btw I realize the grammatical issues of my previous message- it's what happens when you're doing this at work and keep getting interrupted.
...
nickd

Jan 5, 2011, 10:03 AM
I'd rather sit in the car for hours and wait for the warrant.
...
jeffdws

Jan 5, 2011, 7:30 PM
I guess that depends on the person and the situation. If I have no plans and time to kill and/or there was something that would be incriminating or embarrassing, then sure I would wait.
...
Snapper314

Jan 4, 2011, 7:40 PM
This should be illegal without a warrant. Another bad ruling issued from the idiots in the California courts. Mad

For those foolish enough to think this is a Good Thing... remember the words of Benjamin Franklin: "those who are willing to sacrifice freedom for security deserve neither".

How about we make it legal for police to enter and search your homes without a Warrant, Probable Cause, or Reasonable Suspicion. If you have nothing to hide...

How about we make it legal for police to access and search your bank accounts without a Warrant, Probable Cause, or Reasonable Suspicion. If you have nothing to hide...

An arrest or detainment for a specific crime DOES NOT remove the protections provided by the U.S. Constitution. An...
(continues)
...
Renaldo

Jan 5, 2011, 9:38 AM
No, by the means of arrest, the person has given their rights away in the instance of a crime. The report from Cali states not, if the police arrest you then probable cause has been obtained. If your phone is on your person then it can be searched. It is we the people that need to watch who we put into office that makes these rules for us. We need to be included in process.
...
Vipermad

Jan 5, 2011, 10:22 AM
Renaldo said:
No, by the means of arrest, the person has given their rights away in the instance of a crime. The report from Cali states not, if the police arrest you then probable cause has been obtained. If your phone is on your person then it can be searched. It is we the people that need to watch who we put into office that makes these rules for us. We need to be included in process.


Uh....no. By means of arrest you are still INNOCENT until proven GUILTY. If your phone is not directly part and parcel of your crime, it is off limits. Sure, they can "detain" you and "detain" your property....but they still must be required to justify WHY they need to look in your phone. Arrest someone for being drunk...
(continues)
...
Mark_S

Jan 5, 2011, 12:59 PM
Not necessarily for DUI infractions.
When stopped with bricks of heroin under the spare tire in your trunk, weapons, to name a few, the phone is a treasure trove of information that can be used to guarantee a more solid conviction.
When there is probable cause.
Abusing the procedure just to bust someones hump, that needs to be stopped.
...

This forum is closed.

Please log in to report a message to the moderator.

This forum is closed.


all discussions

Subscribe to Phone Scoop News with RSS Follow @phonescoop on Twitter Phone Scoop on Facebook Subscribe to Phone Scoop on YouTube Follow on Instagram

 

All content Copyright 2001-2015 Phone Factor, LLC. All Rights Reserved.
Content on this site may not be copied or republished without formal permission.
1