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N Series coming US! WOot

Ludio

Jun 30, 2005, 9:12 AM
I hope the N70 if it comes here will be the Hspda version with UMTS 850/ 1900 that would be hella sweet. N90 withn in the next month also excellent and N91 maybe sometime this year cu zz i don't think but do hope for earliar than a march debut for us. Decent I guess consdering we never got none of the good stuff before.
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saithkar

Jun 30, 2005, 7:35 PM
North America never gets any of the good phones because of the novel concept of using the 850/1900mhz band as opposed to the 900/1800 band that the rest of the world uses. Since CDMA and TDMA use the 800/1900 bandwidth as well, so it seems that there's a lot of frequency space out there that's not being used. The North American carriers should have had the forsight to use 900/1800 like the rest of the world and then GSM could have truly been the global standard, but until that time, there will be a lag between when the rest of the world gets awesome new phones like the Nseries, and when they finally trickle down to over here.
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eric Lin

Jun 30, 2005, 8:32 PM
saithkar, it's not the us carriers who you should be upset with, it's the fcc and other US government agencies. the carriers can only build networks in the bands that the government makes available to them. the government, either because the bands were being used or because they wanted to be different, made 800, and 1900 mhz spectrum available, and then added 850 too - none of which are what is used overseas (except s.korea). now carriers have to beg or scrounge for phones. it's not the carriers' fault though.
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saithkar

Jun 30, 2005, 8:42 PM
Ah interesting, thanks for clearing that up. Now of course the question begs what exactly has the FCC got planned for the 900/1800 frequencies then? The point I was making (if a little acerbically as I'm having a bad day) is that there seems to be all this space available, while both the GSM and TDMA companies are all trying to use the same frequencies, I mean even AT&T used UMTS on 1900 mhz I do believe. So Perhaps the carriers could talk to the FCC about freeing up the 900/1800 frequecies so they'rd be more space available for future expansions, and as Ludio commented, quicker rollout of the latest phones for the US and Canada. I'm sure others think likewise.
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seedub

Jul 1, 2005, 4:07 AM
The 900mhz band is and has been used by the US military for many years, hence the reason for not using it on mobile phones. The US I believe started using 1900mhz before 1800mhz came out oversees, and instead of using 2 high bands, they decided to go for a low/high combo like Europe.
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muchdrama

Jul 1, 2005, 11:49 AM
saithkar said:
Ah interesting, thanks for clearing that up. Now of course the question begs what exactly has the FCC got planned for the 900/1800 frequencies then? The point I was making (if a little acerbically as I'm having a bad day) is that there seems to be all this space available, while both the GSM and TDMA companies are all trying to use the same frequencies, I mean even AT&T used UMTS on 1900 mhz I do believe. So Perhaps the carriers could talk to the FCC about freeing up the 900/1800 frequecies so they'rd be more space available for future expansions, and as Ludio commented, quicker rollout of the latest phones for the US and Canada. I'm sure others think likewise.


Put it this way: If those two ...
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muchdrama

Jul 1, 2005, 11:43 AM
saithkar said:
North America never gets any of the good phones because of the novel concept of using the 850/1900mhz band as opposed to the 900/1800 band that the rest of the world uses. Since CDMA and TDMA use the 800/1900 bandwidth as well, so it seems that there's a lot of frequency space out there that's not being used. The North American carriers should have had the forsight to use 900/1800 like the rest of the world and then GSM could have truly been the global standard, but until that time, there will be a lag between when the rest of the world gets awesome new phones like the Nseries, and when they finally trickle down to over here.


It has nothing to do with foresight. The GSM bands that were avail...
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MJdub

Jul 1, 2005, 6:40 PM
Just to clear something up -- T-Mobile isn't your only option for foreign tri-band phones. I have no idea why everyone says this but it is not true. I was an AT&T Wireless customer, and I guess I'm technically on the Cingular network now but I still haven't signed over to Cingular. I have been using European phones for almost three years now. In fact, the Sony Ericsson P800 that you used to be able to buy through AT&T appeared to be from the UK and was 900/1800/1900. I had that and got great signal with AT&T. Right now I'm using a Sony Ericsson K700i (900/1800/1900) and I get even better signal than I used to before Cingular and AT&T merged. I also have a friend that uses foreign phones and they work fine for him too (he is also on AT...
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Rich Brome

Jul 4, 2005, 11:53 AM
This is certainly possible in many areas, but I would never recommend this.

Cingular does use 1900 extensively, but they also use 850 just as extensively.

So with a 1900-only phone, there are practically whole states where you will get no service at all, and plenty of areas were you will have more dead zones than you should, and more "network busy" messages than you should.

Basically, you're only getting half of Cingular's network.

You may also find Cingular moving GSM capacity to 850 and shutting off GSM 1900 in some places as they roll out 3G. Lots of spectrum needs to be re-shuffled to make room for WCDMA, so that's a very real possibility.
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