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T-Mobile to Squelch Data Speeds of Terms Violators

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Includes $70 Unlimited Data

rwalford79

Aug 14, 2014, 11:59 AM
This also included users of the $70 Simple Choice plan with Unlimited 4G High Speed Data as well. That add-on to the original $50 base plan is $20, which gives the $70 price. Grandfathered customers are still subject to T&C regarding network management which has been written into all contracts including month to month contracts for the last decade or so. Nothing new here, just TMobile tightening up the ship.
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bobc74

Aug 14, 2014, 7:10 PM
And just how many sales reps over the last decade or so have informed their customers that this was possible? If I'd have to guess, 0. But I'm also guessing, they had no problem telling the customer many times during the transaction that the data was "unlimited".
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srich27

Aug 15, 2014, 9:26 AM
How many reps of anything go over every single line of any contract you sign and tell you "Don't break the Terms you are agreeing to"? If I'd have to guess, 0. I'm certain they didn't have a problem telling the customer that the data was unlimited, because that's perfectly true (or as true as can by physically expected...people who expect "infinite" anything are simply unreasonable).

If you break a contract you signed, the fact that all they're going to do is throttle you a bit is pretty generous of them.
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Zpike

Aug 15, 2014, 12:13 PM
>>people who expect "infinite" anything are simply unreasonable

It never fails to amaze me how people want to use "unlimited" and "infinite" interchangeably when it suits them.
When someone expects a provider to allow them as much data as they can get in a month at the advertised speed without any throttling, that is unlimited data, not infinite data. And it is not unreasonable to expect just that if that is what the provider advertised. What is unreasonable is for carriers to advertise one thing and then change the service once the customer is locked into a 2 year contract and then blame the customer for using the advertised service.
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srich27

Aug 15, 2014, 2:28 PM
I'm not using them interchangeably. You complained as though these users aren't still getting unlimited data when they very clearly still are (albeit at a slower speed). If you want unlimited data at whatever speed you want (even after breaking your end of a contract) what you're asking for is infinite utilization of a finite resource. To complain about this fact is, as I said, unreasonable.

They aren't throttling people because they're using too much of their unlimited data, they're throttling them because they're doing things against the terms of the contract. If they wanted, T-Mobile could cut them off completely for that. As I said, it's generous of them to only throttle such users.
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Jarahawk

Aug 17, 2014, 2:20 PM
It's not generous. It's certainly not fair. Carriers want money but would prefer that consumers not actually use the service for which they are paying. Verizon can get away with this arrogance but I don't believe T-Mobile has the same resources to do so. Only time will tell.
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iamthephonemaster

Aug 19, 2014, 7:46 AM
I am going to have to agree with Jarahawk. Wireless companies in this country advertise things like " unlimited" data and then in the fine print try to LIMIT how you can use the data. If it really was " unlimited" tethering and file sharing shouldn't matter. However they put these things into agreements ( nobody in wireless sales has been trained to say contract in 15 years) to avoid having to provide the very thing they are selling to people. It's the exact same as going to an all you can eat buffet and then them coming up to you and saying " well you've had your 3 plates, don't eat any more". Then they point to a small print on the menu that says " all you can eat buffet consists of eating all you can eat in 3 plates". Wireless companies h...
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Brad K

Aug 19, 2014, 11:06 AM
Your example is not quite on point. It's more like you go to an all you can eat buffet and try to load up 3 plates and they tell you no you can only use one plate at a time so they have enough available for the other customers who are eating at the same time. You still have all you can eat but you can't bring the whole buffet to your table.

It's better to have a few customers upset over throttling speeds than to have every customer upset when the network crashes due to overload.
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iamthephonemaster

Aug 19, 2014, 11:27 AM
The analogy is still valid because the point is not in dispute. They are trying to limit something which was advertised as limitless. Your analogy though does bring up the folly in offering something as limitless which clearly has a limit. It's like if I gave you a car that tips out at 200 mph. And then told you go as fast as you want. Well what if I want to go 210? I can't because the limit on the car is 200. So therefore your offer of " as fast as you want " is invalid. Either way it's not the few who are tethered they should worry about upsetting it's the masses that will see just as I have that it shouldn't be marketed and sold as unlimited if it has limits.
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Brad K

Aug 19, 2014, 1:03 PM
I think the issue is when they started advertising the unlimited data plans it was in reference to the amount of data. Speeds were never intended to be promised as unlimited but people seem to have taken it that way. More like if a race track advertised that you could take unlimited laps around but when you start you find that there is a speed limit. Not false advertising just too many assumed expectations on the consumer side.
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iamthephonemaster

Aug 19, 2014, 2:08 PM
The onus is on the race track to make sure the customer understands the speed limit. Which is the same reason here are speed limit signs on the interstate. Wireless companies get around this by drafting agreements with fine print and only advertising the parts they want people to know. Also they change the terms of the agreement while the customer is in it and claim that they have the right to do it because the original agreement said they could. However if they were taken to court the judge as I'm sure they already know would tell them that both parties have to be aware and agree to a change in any binding agreement. They simply say " unlimited". What else is supposed to be expected? That's why I said they should do all plans with a cap ins...
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Brad K

Aug 19, 2014, 2:44 PM
When I started seeing the unlimited data advertisements I expected from the beginning that it was just in reference to the amount of data and not the speeds, but that's probably due to me working and being around and working in the wireless industry pretty much my whole life. Yea, they are doing the X GB at 4G and unlimited 1x data after that now, especially for the no contract options. They are still legally able to advertise it as unlimited data but we can blame the lawyers for that mess.
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iamthephonemaster

Aug 19, 2014, 3:04 PM
There in lies the issue though. Most people haven't been around the wireless industry for 20 years like you or I. What they expect is exactly what they are told. If they want to still market as. " unlimited" they should say no overages. Meaning that you can only use a certain amount of 4g but the good news is you'll never be charged an overage because after you've used your cap you just slow down to 2g or whatever. It may be not as sexy to advertise but it's the truth.
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Zpike

Aug 20, 2014, 12:02 PM
You guys are going on and on about unlimited, like it means the same thing as infinite when it doesn't.

Infinite data would truly be as much data as fast as you like, heck all at one time. With infinite data, you should easily download the entire internet in a micro second.

No one ever advertised that and no one ever expected that, and that was never the impication of "unlimited data".

Unlimited data means we don't limit the flow of data to you. So, if you have agreed on data at 1.5 mb/s you can feasibly get that continuously every day of your billing cycle. In 30 days, that comes to 486GB.

Just because you want to go over that and download say 600GB in 30 days doesn't mean your data isn't unlimited. It just means you're retar...
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iamthephonemaster

Aug 20, 2014, 1:07 PM
I wasn't aware either of us said we were talking about infinite data. We were however talking about the difference in " unlimited" and what carriers actually provide. And just so you know infinite means without end forever. So by putting a time constraint of a 30 day billing cycle you are in fact limiting something that's supposed to go on forever. That's why nobody would ever use the word infinite. But I hope your grasp of the English language makes you feel better. Next time spell check your post though. Lol
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Zpike

Aug 22, 2014, 3:36 PM
>>I wasn't aware either of us said we were talking about infinite data.

No, you insist on using the word "unlimited," when you in fact mean "infinite". That's the problem. And I made that point more than amply clear in my previous post.

>>And just so you know infinite means without end forever.

No, infinite does not imply any length of time. I could feasibly be infinitely large for only a second. And that is where you completely screw up your next point.

>>So by putting a time constraint of a 30 day billing cycle you are in fact limiting something that's supposed to go on forever.

No, 30 days is 30 days. It ends at the end of 30 days. No one in their right mind thinks 30 days is longer than 30 days, much less infinitely long.
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Zpike

Aug 22, 2014, 3:58 PM
You criticized me for one typo where I clearly missed the "l" in "implication". But after rereading your posts I found one with three typo's. Furthermore, I could criticize you for your use of sentence fragments, run on sentences, flip flopping perspective, poor comma usage, consistently wrong quotation usage, and much more if I cared to find it. How about we quit trying to be grammar nazis and focus on the dialogue?
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iamthephonemaster

Aug 22, 2014, 4:08 PM
in·fi·nite
ˈinfənit/
adjective
1.
limitless or endless in space, extent, or size; impossible to measure or calculate.
"the infinite mercy of God"
synonyms: boundless, unbounded, unlimited, limitless, never-ending, interminable; More
antonyms: limited, small
very great in amount or degree.
"he bathed the wound with infinite care"
MATHEMATICS
greater than any assignable quantity or countable number.
MATHEMATICS
(of a series) able to be continued indefinitely.



I know that's a lot for your to read, but the important parts are " able to be continued indefinitely" and " limitless in space, extent or size, impossible to calculate" also boundless and limitless.

Now tell me again what infinite means please?


You unfir...
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Zpike

Aug 22, 2014, 4:27 PM
This is very embarrassing for you. I have made it abundantly clear that the problem was your usage of "unlimited" as though it meant "infinite". And then you go and post a definition of "infinite" as though anyone were ever contesting its meaning. But since you like definitions so much, here is the definition of "unlimited" for your perusal.

unlimited
[uhn-lim-i-tid] Spell Syllables
Synonyms Examples Word Origin
adjective
1.
not limited; unrestricted; unconfined:
unlimited trade.
2.
boundless; infinite; vast:
the unlimited skies.
3.
without any qualification or exception; unconditional.

Of the three definitions above, only 2 is synonymous with infinite. Both 1 and 3 easily keep their meaning without being infinite. The exam...
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iamthephonemaster

Aug 22, 2014, 6:28 PM
I think it's actually unfortunate for you. Because I must be the only person that sees the word infinite IN THE DEFINITION OF UNLIMITED!!! Man you're one dense idiot. Unlimited and infinite mean the same thing. LITERALLY. They both mean " without end or limits" to put it in lay person. Can you really not comprehend that? I mean it is right in front of you in black in white of your own post. Either way you're not rebutting my post against wireless companies use of " unlimited" in their sales when in fact it is limited. Whether in speed or allotment. Please don't respond and make yourself look any worse. This is getting embarrassing for you.
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Zpike

Aug 27, 2014, 8:54 AM
Have fun with your alternate reality.
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Zpike

Aug 27, 2014, 10:19 AM
But you're too amusing and i think I can get another laugh out of you. So, here goes.

>>I think it's actually unfortunate for you.

That I got stuck in a conversation with someone as confused as yourself? Yes, its unfortunate.

>>Because I must be the only person that sees the word infinite IN THE DEFINITION OF UNLIMITED!!!

Wow, that's some real rage there. Too bad you missed the fact that only one definition of unlimited has an infinite context. You actually "see[s] the word infinite IN [ONE] DEFINITION OF UNLIMITED!!!" But unfortunately for you, most words have more than one definition. I pointed that out to you in my previous post. You really have trouble with reading comprehension don't you.

>>Man you're one dense idiot.
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Zpike

Aug 20, 2014, 11:50 AM
>>I'm not using them interchangeably.

Yes, you are.

>>You complained as though these users aren't still getting unlimited data when they very clearly still are (albeit at a slower speed).

See, you just did it.

>>If you want unlimited data at whatever speed you want (even after breaking your end of a contract) what you're asking for is infinite utilization of a finite resource.

And there you go again. Did you pass basic math in high school? Do you understand the difference between finite and infinite numbers?

>>They aren't throttling people because they're using too much of their unlimited data

Lie.

>> they're throttling them because they're doing things against the terms of the contract.

Another lie.

Streaming ...
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iamthephonemaster

Aug 22, 2014, 7:49 PM
"It's generous of phonescoop to allow such uninformed opinions in these forums."

I couldn't agree more zpike.
Starting with your uninformed drivel.

You are correct in stating that customers who are sold " unlimited" data should be able to use as much as they want. And since the data plans in question were sold as " unlimited 4g " then they should get that. Unlimited 4g data for as long as they are customers.

What your wrong about is that nobody in this post mentioned the word " infinite" or alluded to anything being such.

But as I've already proven in my other posts at length is that the word infinite and unlimited are basically the same. So much so that both words appear in the definition for the other.

But again thank...
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Zpike

Aug 27, 2014, 9:03 AM
>>I couldn't agree more zpike.
Starting with your uninformed drivel.

what a troll comment

>>What your wrong about is that nobody in this post mentioned the word " infinite" or alluded to anything being such.

That's an outright lie.

>>But as I've already proven in my other posts at length is that the word infinite and unlimited are basically the same.

Another lie. You said they were "literally" the same, not "basically" the same. So are you going to back off that lie or this one? Or are you now going to tell me literally and basically mean the same thing as well? Must be convenient to be able to change the definition of a word when it suits you.

The real truth is that "infinite" and "unlimited" are similar in meaning, (...
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