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Sprint's iDEN Network Shuts Down Tonight

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Top message:  Farwell Beep Beep by MadFatMan   Jun 29, 2013, 9:45 AM

Replying to:  Re: Dude by cellphonesaretools   Jul 2, 2013, 9:09 AM

Re: Dude

by Zpike    Jul 3, 2013, 12:06 AM

First of all take a chill pill. Second of all, I don't think I misinterpreted you at all. Perhaps you misspoke.

>> I never stated Nextel was the only mfgr with speakerphone.

No, but you said this "Yes, speakerphones were common on landlines at the time, but not common on most cellphones in the early 2000s" But that's a fabrication. The burden of proof of this statement is on you, and since the truth can be ascertained on this very website, you should be able to produce it.

>> I never stated anyone else borrowed the idea from Nextel.

But if that's not what you were driving at, then why did you say this, "Back in Nextel's heyday, most other cell-phones had no speakerphone capability, so the majority of the public kept their flip-phones/bar-phones pressed against their ears...they had no other choice. Now that all other manufacturers have included speakerphone capability in non-PTT handsets, the general population has begun using them... ?"

Weren't you implying that after Nextel's decline other manufacturers started borrowing the idea and mainstreamed it? Even if you weren't implying that, what you're saying is still based on the premise that speakerphone technology wasn't widely available. But it actually was very common, and you refuse to recognize that.

Furthermore, I would be willing to bet that there were more RAZR phones in use than all Nextel phones combined. But you didn't see people with RAZR's running around acting like jackasses on speaker phones. And that's exactly what you were implying would happen when you said, "Now that all other manufacturers have included speakerphone capability in non-PTT handsets, the general population has begun using them in public, just as cluelessly & inconsiderately as any former Nextel PTT user." But if that were really true you would have seen the same phenomenon among RAZR users of the time. This point can be little more than conjecture.

>> your particular example is irrelevant, in that the Razr was not widely available nor widely used until near the beginning of 2005

If that's so, then by extension your comparison to modern smartphones is also irrelevant, as they are also outside of the time period. But that's not what you were trying to say is it? What you were trying to say is that PTT got a bad rap, and that when speakerphones became more common they were just as commonly abused, correct?

But the RAZR is the prime example of what you are saying not being true. Lets go out on an implausible limb here and suppose that speakerphones really had not been common prior to the RAZR, then they would have been a sensational, revolutionary feature on the hottest phone on the planet that everyone was dying to explore. How is it that all those eager users missed this revolutionary feature and failed to abuse it as you concluded they would?

But I did agree with you when you said, "Which illustrates that the problem is the people using it..." I'm a software developer, so no one knows the frustration of stupid users like I do. But I'd be a bad developer if I constantly wrote code that allowed users to easily break the program with their stupidity. So, let's face it- PTT technology makes it a lot easier to be an accidental jackass than a speakerphone that you have to purposely activate, and that automatically turns off at the end of every conversation. I'm not saying that PTT doesn't have its uses, but this is a failing of the technology you don't seem willing to own up to.

>>Please, next time carefully read the entire thread before popping off,

Try saying something logical and you'll get very little popping off from me.

>>Motorola Razr is a series of mobile phones by Motorola, part of the 4LTR line...released in the market in the third quarter of 2004.

God I hate wikipedia quotes, they're so lazy. But since you started it, here's one for you, "At the time of its 2005 merger with Sprint Communications, Nextel had over twenty million subscribers in the United States, and served 198 of the top 200 markets."

Any logical person should be able to deduce that a phone that was an immediate success in 2005 and dominated the market in 2006 was right in Nextel's "heyday." Nextel's decline wasn't that rapid.

>>interjecting your misinterpretations

If anyone misinterpreted you, it was you.

>>and wrongly assigning them to me

All I have assigned to you is what you have said. Excuse me if it doesn't make sense.

>>and slamming my family and friends.

First, I never mentioned your family. Second, I wasn't trying to slam your friends as much as I was trying to point out that the experiences of yourself and your small circle of friends was hardly indicative of the entire cellphone toting population. Limited personal experience has never been a logical foundation for assertions about the greater population. Perhaps you should start making arguments based on more than conjecture, fabrication, and limited personal experience?

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