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T-Mobile's Galaxy Note II Costs $369

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Really

Luar

Oct 24, 2012, 7:47 AM
I mean really T-Mobile, after all you are not the best carrier of them all and on top of that you are going to sell this phone with the most expensive price??? Come on really??? And $369.00 after the mail in rebate. Wow just wow.
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Jellz

Oct 24, 2012, 8:22 AM
Their plans are less expensive, so they don't offer the same subsidy as the other carriers.
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T Bone

Oct 24, 2012, 9:36 AM
My unlocked GSM Galaxy Nexus cost $399.99......and one can get that Sony dual SIM Ice Cream Sandwich phone for only $199.99 off contract....

If I have to pay nearly $400 for a phone I don't want a contract on top of that...
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Jellz

Oct 24, 2012, 10:55 AM
I hear you, I'm certainly not going to be buying the Galaxy Note II on any carrier, least of all T-Mobile. $300+ is way too much for a contract phone IMO, but this is a high end half-smartphone, half-tablet device that's going to have high demand.
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Luar

Oct 24, 2012, 10:59 AM
Why not just wait for black friday and get it for $200.00 or probably $150.00. It happens every year with every phone , they go in a crazy special that weekend. I'm getting 2 of them so I'll wait for that weekend. Just not on T-Mobile.
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Tofuchong

Oct 24, 2012, 10:46 AM
Exactly. I'm not sure why more people don't understand this. T-Mobile is about low cost PLANS, not necessarily low cost phones.
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Jayshmay

Oct 24, 2012, 11:47 AM
I don't understand what rate plans & prices of smarphones
have to do with each other.

A rate plan is something you pay for each and every month,
smartphone is something you pay for once.

I swear the wireless industry is so screwed up
compared to other industries.

Cable companies don't sell tv, nor does how much you spend on your tv have anything to do with your monthly bill.
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Tofuchong

Oct 24, 2012, 11:57 AM
Thats because very few things work like cell phones do.
If cable companies broadcasted over specific frequencies and only certain tvs could get that service - it would be the same.

Its the nature of the cellular industry which is the reason it's so messed up, and I agree it completly is.

If the FCC mandated that all cellular devices are compatable with all carriers in the United States, things might be different, but they'll never do that becuase that would be bad for business. Hey- Just becuase a cell phone can be used with another carrier doesnt mean people wouldn't still be responsible for an ETF.

Business made the industry what it is today. Letting anybody use your device on any service or any way they want to just doesn't...
(continues)
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Jellz

Oct 24, 2012, 5:42 PM
The rate plans will determine how much profit the company is making off your service each month. If, let's say as an example, AT&T is making $20 more a month per smartphone than T-Mobile, then they're making a whole $480 more over the course of the contract than T-Mobile. Then they can return a portion of that extra profit to the customer by giving them a larger phone subsidy.

I'm not saying I disagree, it is a messed up system. But without it, who would own phones? The iPhone 5 starts at $649, you're getting a $450 subsidy there! Most good Android phones are over $400. People demand less expensive phones, and the two options available are for the manufacturers to cut costs and produce shoddy phones (like we see on MetroPCS or other pre...
(continues)
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ParagonAwesome

Oct 24, 2012, 8:25 AM
Really, you sound suprised that T-Mobile has the most expensive version, Besides its if you take the Value plan which ends up being cheaper the discounted price doesnt apply
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Luar

Oct 24, 2012, 9:03 AM
I worked for T-Mobile a couple of years ago. And this wasent really the case back then. People will not be happy with the MIR plus $369.00. And it only is cheaper if you go thrue there Loyalty department.
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ParagonAwesome

Oct 24, 2012, 10:12 AM
True but if your on a value plan the down payment is only $250 and thats out the door w/o a MIR
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Luar

Oct 24, 2012, 10:57 AM
" Alternately, customers wishing to subscribe to one of T-Mobile's Value Plans can make a $249.99 downpayment on the Note II, followed by 20 monthly payments of $20 on their bill via T-Mobile's Equipment Installment Plan (EIP).
"


So in other words $249.99 down payment = $20 X 20 = $249.99 + $400 = $649.99. What the hell is this??? Of course there won't be a MIR with this travesty, that's s a full on rape right there. But I have to assume that Erik mis wrote that part.
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Tofuchong

Oct 24, 2012, 11:16 AM
No, He didn't make a mistake. That is how T-Mobile value plans work. Value plans cost significantly less than the other plans that do provide discounts.
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srich27

Oct 25, 2012, 7:20 AM
Why would that be a mistake? That's how the Value plan works. You get a cheap plan with no contract, and you buy the phone for full price. Its just this way you don't pay full price up front, but spread out over a payment plan.

Granted, Value Plan + $20 device payment makes your monthly costs probably about the same as going to one of the other carriers and getting a subsidy (though without the service contract)
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Rich Brome

Oct 24, 2012, 11:05 AM
It's one of the most feature-packed, high-end phones on the market. Its true cost on the open market (unlocked) is $700. It's not a cheap phone. It's not aimed at the price-conscious.
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Jarahawk

Oct 24, 2012, 7:34 PM
Troll much?
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Luar

Oct 25, 2012, 8:56 AM
Funny how people like to us that Troll word... Laughing Laughing Laughing ... That just comes out when you run out of things to say and your only 2 neurons are playing ping pong Wink
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