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Adobe to Give Up On iPhone Development Tools

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Apr 21, 2010, 8:06 AM

Another iPhone Fail...

Android OS FTW!!! Twisted Evil Twisted Evil Twisted Evil
And will continue to do so.
Good for them. I could really care less about thier sales. I work for a Verizon Wireless indirect and the iPhone sales do not affect my paycheck at all. So again I state Android OS FTW!!!

Apr 21, 2010, 2:37 PM

QUOTE: Apple to Adobe: "Someone Has It Backwords"

“Someone has it backwards — it is HTML5, CSS, JavaScript, and H.264 (all supported by the iPhone and iPad) that are open and standard, while Adobe’s Flash is closed and proprietary,” said spokeswoman Trudy Miller in a statement."


Certain irony to all of you iPhone haters- the iPhone is making a giant leap forward for open development- solely because Apple is putting their foot down with Adobe's Flash crap. It's Apple making this push- Google can't decide whether or not it likes Flash.

(Also, although Flash for desktop is mature, Flash for mobile most certainly is not. HTML 5 is far ahead of Flash in the mobile world.)
I'mpositive I read that somewhere, because firefox junkies were complaining about it.
Apple needs to take the word "proprietary" out of their vocabulary. That's what all Apple products are, so how are they to criticize someone else who is established in the market on their product "Flash" because they are one of the few who won't kiss ...

Apr 21, 2010, 3:19 PM

Why do most smartphones support HTML5 and not Flash???

This might sound odd, I mean, considering flash has been around for what, forever, and HTML5 is just a baby in comparison...

WHY are most phones, in fact ALL phones incompatible with flash right now?

Could it maybe have something to do with the possibility that Steve Jobs was right when he called Adobe "lazy"?

Just throwing it out there for everyone to chew on...
I think its more so HTML is smaller and easier to handle on phones.
Apple's efforts with the Webkit fork of KHTML- a small, efficient and excellent rendering system has been widely adopted by all of the major smartphone OS's (except WinMo, but that's a dead OS anyway.)

Webkit doesn't get the emotional love that F...

Apr 21, 2010, 9:12 AM

Apple has something up their sleeve

Guarantee they do, come on apple always controls themselves nobody else controls them. So they just want more websites to focus on HTML5 which runs smoother then flash anyways. If everyone starts to use HTML5 I wonder the effect that will have on Adobe's business?
HTML5 runs smoother on Apple hardware, yes. But on windows devices (and handhelds with hardware acceleration) Flash runs the same, or better than html5, especially for detailed content.

html5 might be the future, but it's still several years from ...

Apr 21, 2010, 9:18 AM

What about the iPhone makes people DEMAND flash/adobe support??


This company, you know, the one you hate but care so so so so so much about, it doesn't care about you. Honestly, it doesn't. Apple cares about the people who are spending money on their products. And most of the iPhones critics don't own an iPhone... weird.

I know your feelings are hurt because Apple is not doing exactly what you are telling them to do but you really need to get over it.

The mentality Apple has "We built the product, we designed the OS, in fact, we are so confident in our process that we would like you to use the tools we have provided to develop for the one platform you can actually make money on"

I sell T-Mobile and I see NO flash support currently or planned ...
I don't think this article is about flash support as much as it is about how Apple is disallowing 3rd party development environments. So Flash developers can write applications for the iPhone with the CS5 but that will change when iPhone OS 4 comes ou...
You have no marketing savy, almost 98% of the devices you mentioned aren't worth putting flash on. Flash support is great for business customers and the few tech savy people who visit sites that require flash support to function at full capabilities.
They're not talking about playing flash on the iphone here. They already gave up on that. what they are talking about is in the newest version of Adobe Creative Suite had a compiler that developers could make an app using code they were familiar wit...

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Apr 21, 2010, 11:14 AM

Adobe belongs nowhere near platform development- period.

You can say "another iPhone fail" all you want, but the truth of the matter is that any platform that relies too heavily on these "write once publish everywhere" environments is doomed to fail. (See: Java.)

But let's look at the facts here-

1) Flash CS5 doesn't follow nor encourage developers to follow ANY iPhone interface guidelines.

2) Flash CS5's iPhone compiler was horribly inefficient. Take a look at the Flash CS5 applications on the iTunes App Store. They're nowhere near as good as native apps.

So that's right upfront. Now, let's look at this:

3) Adobe's track record with updates is abysmal - Adobe didn't even release Intel-native versions of its Creative Suite for 2 years after the transition was anno...
No seriously, this is a pretty damn good post.

I can't find any argument whatsoever to this.

Apr 21, 2010, 10:58 AM

Who Cares? Apple is yesterday's news.

The iPhone linked to ATT is on it's last leg.
and it's a news article...

Apr 21, 2010, 8:20 AM


Adobe has been the main creator of programs and support for years. True graphics designers have been using Adobe and Apple products because they integrate together so well.
I guess Apple has pissed off the wrong company. I really wonder what is truly going one.
Apple may have something up there sleeves. I wonder which processors will work good with Flash 10.1. Probably the Snapdragon processor at the minimum.
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