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Nokia Taking Different Path to Wireless Charging

Article Comments  4  

Jun 10, 2009, 11:10 AM   by Eric M. Zeman   @phonescooper

Nokia researchers are working to develop a way for phones to charge by capturing ambient radio waves. Radio waves are emitted by all sorts of electronics, and Nokia's research is focused on a way to harvest this energy as it hits the phone's battery. Using technology similar to RFID, Nokia is converting the electromagnetic energy into an actual electrical current. Nokia can currently "harvest" 3 to 5 milliwatts of power, but says 50 milliwatts is needed to charge a phone that is powered off. Nokia has not indicated if or when this technology would be mature enough to use in end-user devices.

more info at Technology Review »
more info at Mobile Burn »



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This forum is closed.


Jun 10, 2009, 12:41 PM

I wonder

Does my brain pick up these radio waves and if so is that the cause of my headache?
So the phone emits radio waves, and absorbs them to charge.... is this like that perpetual motion thing that creates it's own energy?...
Nokia I love you from the beginning.
we could use a giant cellphone as the nations powersource... genius
flip mode

Jun 10, 2009, 1:30 PM


This is so futuristic, if anyone remembers seeing G.I Joe the movie....cobra was trying to steal the B.E.T (Broadcast Energy Transmitter) which could wirelessly produce and transmit electricity. The 80's were the best...good times Cool

Jun 10, 2009, 12:23 PM

great idea

your phone would automatically charge anytime you were near electronics (which is almost always) if perfected you may not need to ever plug a phone into the wall
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