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printed September 2, 2014
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Review: Samsung Continuum

Form Basics Extras Video Tour Wrap-Up Comments  3  

Multimedia Camera Image Quality Browse / Customize Extras  

Browse

The Web browser on the Samsung Continuum is the standard Android 2.1 browser. The only addition I could find was a brightness setting for the browser itself. This seems to be a trend with Samsung, since I know the Galaxy Tab tablet has the same feature. I found it unnecessary. The browser also uses Flash 10.1. Flash videos could be very slow to start, with a framerate that looked to be in the single digits. But once the video was preloaded it played more smoothly. It never reached the performance of the other Flash-enabled Android phones I've used, like the Fascinate or the aging Google Nexus One, even. But it did let me watch CNN videos in a pinch if something caught my interest.

Customize

 

Click a thumbnail above for a larger view.

The ticker on the Samsung Continuum allows for some customization within the limited feature set it offers. You can choose from a number of popular news and sports RSS feeds, or you can enter your own feed address and the ticker will deliver headlines as they pop up. I wish it were more automatic. You cannot simply enter a site's regular web address and let the phone figure out the RSS feed. You have to enter the actual feed XML address, which can be cumbersome for some sites.

The ticker also gives you some control over the social information it delivers, but not enough. Like I said, you can't choose to receive only @ mentions or DMs from Twitter, for instance. You do get more options with Facebook, where you can receive only pokes and friend requests, for instance, or just incoming messages. I'd still like to see the ticker's capabilities dramatically extended. Every feature on the phone should take advantage of that small screen in some way.

You can customize the app menu by rearranging the app icons. The app menu is divided into panels, like the homescreen. It can be tough to move everything around, but once you have it set up how you like, it becomes a convenient option.

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