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Senators Propose Wireless Consumer Protection Bill

Article Comments  53  

Sep 6, 2007, 2:20 PM   by (staff)

Two senators submitted a bill today that would set federal standards overseeing billing and contracts, and investigate the role handset locking plays in the consumption of wireless goods and services. The bill, called the Cellphone Consumer Empowerment Act of 2007, challenges the cellular industry and could place more regulatory control in the hands of individual state governments. One issue the senators hope to tackle is the listing of government taxes and fees on bills that are often other expenses being passed to subscribers. Wireless industry organizations, including the CTIA, denounced the proposal as detrimental to the public.

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Comments

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xjittianx

Sep 6, 2007, 3:01 PM

unfair?

If the government wants to look into and regular the "unfair" practices of an industry, you'd think they'd turn there attention to Insurance companies instead of the wireless industry.
as far as the "early termination fee" goes, it's the consumers choice to sign a contract to get a discounted price on a service instead of paying the normal charge. it doesn't make sense to break a contract and not have any reprocutions.
I also find it odd that they don't note complaints by company like they do for the automobile industry. why would you group them all together. if company A is getting massive complaints and company B only gets a few, well there's the "unfairness."
to me it's just the governments excuse to put there noses in and "regulate"...
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I understand paying early term fee's if I got a subsidized phone, but not contract extentions without telling the consumer, or if one wants to change minutes on a plan, or if you add or drop a feature like texting or data. That should be regulated.
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I Think contracts are OK. I do however think locking the handset to the service provider is not.
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BigHev

Sep 6, 2007, 4:01 PM

more gov involvement = bad news

IMO Laughing Laughing Laughing Laughing
ALWAYS!!!!




The only thing this bill will do if it is passed is raise the basic rates of all things wireless. the phones will get more expensive, and the plans will have either fewer minutes, higer rates, or both. If these anti-business left...
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TradeMark_310

Sep 6, 2007, 3:34 PM

This sounded bad...

until they said the part about states regulating the rules, I live in California, they will probably just tax the hell out of us and let us do whatever we want as consumers!
I think the Feds are starting to hear about the runaway freight train (The Carriers) and how some of their practices are effecting the consumers. I believe a preemptive strike could help ease bigger problems, as we get less and less quantity of Wirele...
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cellguy23

Sep 8, 2007, 1:33 AM

This is the providers fault

Let's all face it, the wireless providers have got to greedy over the past few years. Initially contracts were used to justify lower initial handset cost for the consumer, which was fine. However now they extend contracts for any reason which is not justifiable in my book. Why should anyone sign a new contract for switching their plan it makes no logical sense.

All providers have activation and upgrade fees for contract customers, however the same providers either don't charge activation fees for pre-paid customer or the activation fee is half the amount.
GSM carriers especially have no reason to charge upgrade fees all they have to do is switch the ****ing Sim card and if you order the phone on line you have to switch the card yourself...
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Becuase you signed a contracted for two years at the price of the plan you choose at the time of activation. if you want to change the terns of the agreement a new contract must be signed.
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