Phone Scoop

printed November 27, 2014
See this page online at:
http://www.phonescoop.com/articles/article.php?a=10456

Home  ›  News  ›

AT&T Wants Device Subsidies to Be As Low As Possible

Article Comments  17  

May 17, 2012, 12:07 PM   by Eric M. Zeman

AT&T Mobility CEO Ralph de la Vega told investors at the JPMorgan Global Technology, Media and Telecom Conference today that the company is doing what it can to offer devices with low subsidies. "We have to watch subsidies and make sure that we bring devices to market that customers love and will keep and have low subsidies," he said. In the U.S., wireless network operators often subsidize the cost of handsets for customers who sign new contracts. Customers are then able to afford a decent device, and the carrier recoups the subsidy over the life of the contract. de la Vega cited the Nokia Lumia 900 and HTC One X as good examples of devices with low subsidy points. "These are great devices that I think customers will like," de la Vega said. The full retail price of the Lumia 900, for example, is $449. AT&T sells it for $99, meaning it subsidizes $350 of the device cost. The iPhone 4S, however, costs $649 at full retail (16GB version). AT&T sells it for $199, meaning it subsidizes $450 of the device cost. Keeping device subsidies low will help AT&T reduce its margins and other costs. de la Vega also reiterated that the company is working to offer shared data plans later this year, which he believes will help increase sales of tablets.

more info at Fierce Wireless »

AD

Comments

Forum Options

This forum is closed.


Subject Author Date
Why not end subsidies? kingstu May 17, 2012, 3:06 PM
In Other News... crood May 17, 2012, 1:32 PM
 
 
Page  1  of 1

This forum is closed.

Subscribe to Phone Scoop News with RSS Follow @phonescoop on Twitter Phone Scoop on Facebook Phone Scoop on Google+ Subscribe to Phone Scoop on YouTube Follow on Instagram

 

All content Copyright 2001-2014 Phone Factor, LLC. All Rights Reserved.
Content on this site may not be copied or republished without formal permission.
2